Get to know somebody

emanko

Senior Member
Arabic- Egyptian
Hello

Sophia talks with her friends about me , to the extent that one of her friends wanted to (get to know me).

Can we use "get to know" here?

The intended meaning is that this friend wanted to meet the speaker and start a friendship with her. So, can we use "get to know" to mean that? Or "get to know" is only used when we're talking about the development of the relationship and not the start? In other words, I kind of feel that one "gets to know" someone they already met.
Please correct me if I'm wrong and help me find the right verb to use between the brackets above.

Thank you
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    In that case I'd use "get to know" - maybe by writing to the speaker.

    The intended meaning is that this friend wanted to meet the speaker and start a friendship with her. So, can we use "get to know" to mean that?
    Yes, I feel you can.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    The intended meaning is that this friend wanted to meet the speaker and start a friendship with her. So, can we use "get to know" to mean that?
    :thumbsup:
    I think you can use it even if they can meet in person. After all there has to be a first time of some sort. We do talk about 'meeting' people on-line. I have some really good friends I met on-line and will never meet in person.
     

    emanko

    Senior Member
    Arabic- Egyptian
    :thumbsup:
    I think you can use it even if they can meet in person. After all there has to be a first time of some sort. We do talk about 'meeting' people on-line. I have some really good friends I met on-line and will never meet in person.
    Do you mean "even if they can't meet in person"?
    So, you don't prefer using "get to know" here and you'd rather use "meet"?
    And please , could you confirm my conclusion that "get to know" carries the connotations of "the development" rather than "the start" of the relationship?

    Thank you
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, I agree that 'get to know' carries the idea of a developing relationship, which might be distinct from a first meeting.

    'We met at a mutual friend's dinner party, but we didn't get to know each other until a couple of years later when we went to the same series of lectures.'

    If you ask to meet somebody, you have the intention of getting to know them. Otherwise it would be 'So pleased to meet you, so pleased to have met you'.
    I think you can use 'get to know them' instead of 'meet', whatever the circumstances.
     

    emanko

    Senior Member
    Arabic- Egyptian
    Thank you.
    I just got a little confused. So, do you suggest that I use "get to know" or "meet" in my original sentence?
     
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