get to know

quietdandelion

Banned
Formosa/Chinese
Have you ever watched wild birds fly past and wanted to learn more about them?
<< Excess quoted text deleted >>
Start looking for birds, and use your notebook to take notes on them. You can start looking in a local park. Once you get to know those feathered friends, go to the countryside or a nature reserve and look for more.



First, what does "get to know" here mean? Is it "come to know" or "start to know?"

Second, I wonder why it's not "feathering friends" but 'feathered friends" since, I presume, "the birds are feathering" makes more sense than "the birds are feathered." Thanks.
 
  • Bookworm123

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Yes, "get to know" in this context means that you are learning about these birds. Feathering here does not make much sense. I prefer the orginial: feathered friends. I don't think this word is actually referring to the action of the birds "feathering" themselves (actually, this is more commonly known as preening). On the other hand, feathered is used to describe that these birds have feathers. "Feathered" here is an adjective. I hope this helps you.
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    Thanks, Bookworm.
    I get the "feathered" part, but I'm still not sure of "get to know." I remember a while ago, a member in this forum told me that "get to" mean "start to" in a different context. Yet, based on the given context, "get to" mean "come to" for me. So I wonder whether it mean "get to" or "come to" here.
     

    Bookworm123

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Thanks, Bookworm.
    I get the "feathered" part, but I'm still not sure of "get to know." I remember a while ago a member in this forum told me that "get to" means "start to" in a different context. Yet based on the given context, "get to" means "come to" for me. So I wonder whether it means "get to" or "come to" here.
    I think the best translation for "get to know" here would be "become familiar with". "Come to know" could work here too; I'm not saying it doesn't, but I don't think it's the best option here. However, it is not wrong to think of it in those terms. I hope this doesn't add more confusion!
     

    Bookworm123

    Senior Member
    USA English
    They all mean the same thing: to become familar with, come to know, and start to know. However, start to know isn't really grammatical. Come to know is usually used for people. Become familiar with is used with people, animals, areas of learning,etc. Since "become familiar with" describes all of these things, and especially birds, in which we are talking about, I believe that it is the best translation. The meaning between those three phrases isn't great at all---it's very,very subtle. I hope this ends your confusion!
     

    Macunaíma

    Senior Member
    português, Brasil
    Get to know is usually used for somebody or something that you already know, but not very well, so I guess become familiar with or is the best definition.

    I had a terrible impression of Arthur when I first met him, but once I got to know him I found out that he's a really nice guy indeed.
     
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