Get to this point: reach a stage (in life) where you do something

Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

Does the phrase "get to this point" meaning "reach a stage (in my life) where I do something (bad, good, unusual, etc)'' sound natural/correct in the examples I made below?

a. Anna, is John hitting you? You can tell me. "No, he hasn't gotten to this point yet, but he's very rude to me and makes threats.''
b. Michael, are you taking antidepressants? "No, I haven't gotten to this point yet, but if I can't get rid of stress as soon as possible, I'll get ill.''

Thank you in advance!
 
  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    No. In each case it would be necessary to say "gotten to that point." In the case of sentence (a), it still isn't probably what I would say -- I don't particularly think of being rude an obnoxious as a path that will eventually lead to physical violence.
     

    Xavier da Silva

    Senior Member
    Thank you very much.

    I don't particularly think of being rude an obnoxious as a path that will eventually lead to physical violence.
    "No, he hasn't gotten to this point yet, but he's very rude to me and makes threats.''
    I also mentioned "....''makes threats''. A threat is normally the last stage before physical violence.

    What do you think?

    Thank you in advance!
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    I also mentioned "....''makes threats''. A threat is normally the last stage before physical violence.
    Oh, maybe. I took it as something like a classroom setting. To be honest, I still don't find it especially natural for that situation, but I guess it depends on the nature of the people involved, the thoughts and expectations of the people involved, and other issues that don't really make sense to discuss in the context of a one-sentence hypothetical.
     
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