get used to

zaffy

Senior Member
Polish
I just wanted to ask you guys about this structure used in the Present Perfect tense, as then it sounds the same as the verb 'have got' meaning 'own.
I've been told:

I have got used to getting up early - sounds OK

She has got used to me - doesn't make sense


Why then the latter doesn't make sense? The one below also doesn't make sense?

She has got used to my methods.
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    In "get used to" something, "get" means "become".

    She has got used to me. :tick:

    My rescue dog was frightened at first, but he's got used to me now. He has got used to my training methods.
     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    For me, too, the word needs to be "gotten", not "got", otherwise it doesn't sound good. ("She got used to me" is fine for past tense.)
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thanks. I asked the same question to a British native speaker of English and he said the 'have got used to me' version didn't make sense to him.


    For me, too, the word needs to be "gotten", not "got", otherwise it doesn't sound good. ("She got used to me" is fine for past tense.)
    But the British don't use 'gotten' in the past participle, do they?
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    he said the 'have got used to me' version didn't make sense to him.
    At first, when I became manager of the Zambia national football team, the players found me a bit weird, but now they have got used to me. :tick:

     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    I can't speak for others, but I do - "she has gotten used to me" sounds fine, whereas "she has got used to me" sounds very wrong.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Would it be a Scottish thing, Dretagoto? :)

    I don't think I've ever said "gotten" in my life. I thought it was pure AE, but obviously I'm mistaken.
     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    Would it be a Scottish thing, Dretagoto? :)

    I don't think I've ever said "gotten" in my life. I thought it was pure AE, but obviously I'm mistaken.
    It's a possibility :p But in my head I can't even hear the sound of anyone saying "got", except in the past tense, it sounds so wrong to me!

    (And inevitably I am now filled with doubt, and wondering if I have ever/would ever say "has got"...)
     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    I'm normally very aware of speech that sounds like AE as opposed to BrE, but "got" sounds absolutely alien to me.

    Maybe it's cultural indoctrination! :p:eek:
     
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