get you started with/at

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kritika

Senior Member
India - Hindi & English
Hello,

What preposition should be used in the following phrase:

To get you started with your new job role.
To get you started at your new job role.

Please explain the reason.

Thanks!
 
  • lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    What is your question? What are you trying to express? Where do these sentences come from? What situation do they describe? What in particular is troubling you? Which one do you think is correct, or do you think both/neither are correct?

    I'll highlight some things for you:

    1. To get you started with your new job role.
    2. To get you started in your new job role.
    3. To get you started at your new job role.

    Which of these phrases looks correct to you, and why?
     

    kritika

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi & English
    What is your questio? - What preposition should be used in the following phrase?
    What are you trying to express? - Just want to see which preposition should follow the phrase "to get started". Context: If you want someone to follow instructions to get started with something.
    What in particular is troubling you? - What's troubling me is the preposition. Should it be "at" or "with"?
    Which one do you think is correct, or do you think both/neither are correct? - To me "started with" seems better, however, have noticed people using "at".
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Okay. That helps a lot.
    To me "started with" seems better, however, have noticed people using "at".
    I agree with you in this sentence.
    To get you started with your new job role. :tick:
    To get you started at your new job role. :cross:
    The phrase "get started" almost always collocates with "with." (It also almost always collocates with "on.") However, the phrase "get started" can also be followed by all sorts of prepositional phrases:

    - to get you started in your new capacity as supervisor
    - to get you started at school
    - to get you started after basic training

    In those phrases, the prepositions match the nouns that follow them, ​not the phrase "get started."
     
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