getting one's rumble on

serafina87

Member
Indonesia
Hi, all.

It's another puzzled-phrase from The Marked Son (at least for me). Really need your help for I've tried to find its meaning at Google but didn't find one.


The path we’re following bends around a clump of trees, and on the other side, Pop stands directly in our way, a determined tilt to his body, like he’s been fighting all day, and he isn’t opposed to getting his rumble on.

Thanks a lot :)
 
  • Man_from_India

    Senior Member
    India
    We need more context to answer this one.
    It might mean "people don't oppose his fightings at all, they let him fight."
     

    dukaine

    Senior Member
    English - American
    In this context, it means that Pop is not afraid to fight, or that he will fight if he has to.

    We use the "get one's....on" idiom with other things also in AE, more commonly urban AE, and it implies doing something with gusto or enthusiasm.

    "Dude, I'm so hungry, when I get home, I'm going to barbecue some ribs and get my grub (eat) on."
    "When I get on stage, I just grab the mic and get my sing on."
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    "Rumble", which is not heard here anymore, used to be common slang for a fight between street gangs. I'm not familiar with "get one's rumble on", past or present.
     

    dukaine

    Senior Member
    English - American
    "Rumble", which is not heard here anymore, used to be common slang for a fight between street gangs. I'm not familiar with "get one's rumble on", past or present.
    I would disagree that "rumble" isn't heard anymore. "Let's get ready to rumble!" is actually quite iconic in certain subcultures.
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    In this context, it means that Pop is not afraid to fight, or that he will fight if he has to.

    We use the "get one's....on" idiom with other things also in AE, more commonly urban AE, and it implies doing something with gusto or enthusiasm.

    "Dude, I'm so hungry, when I get home, I'm going to barbecue some ribs and get my grub (eat) on."
    "When I get on stage, I just grab the mic and get my sing on."
    Hi everybody, I'd like to make sure if I'm using this phrase (get something on) right.

    The amateur artist has been stuck in the office doing a lot of paperwork for two days. He's decided to get his brush on when he gets home
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    I would disagree that "rumble" isn't heard anymore. "Let's get ready to rumble!" is actually quite iconic in certain subcultures.
    Do people no longer remember Muhammad Ali (then Cassius Clay)'s description of his prizefight in DR Congo (then Zaire) as the "rumble in the jungle"?
     

    Man_from_India

    Senior Member
    India
    So what does "get one's....on" idiom mean?
    Need some explanation so that we would not use it incorrectly. Please help.
     

    Man_from_India

    Senior Member
    India
    Thanks for your suggestion. But for learning purpose and for the love of language I want to learn it. Please don't mind my saying. And please help me with that.
     

    dukaine

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Hi everybody, I'd like to make sure if I'm using this phrase (get something on) right.

    The amateur artist has been stuck in the office doing a lot of paperwork for two days. He's decided to get his brush on when he gets home
    I think it totally works. I think you've got the meaning quite right. Keep in mind that this is a very casual and urban way of saying it, so you really have to know what type of crowd you're in to determine whether this idiom is acceptable. So, in some regards, I agree with sdgraham.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I would disagree that "rumble" isn't heard anymore. "Let's get ready to rumble!" is actually quite iconic in certain subcultures.
    Really? It actually dates from the 1940s and was in common street use in the '50s and '60s.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Well, the traveling West Side Story just played Portland and that might be the only time in years the word has been uttered around here, but I guess technically it could be counted as "used." :rolleyes:
    Of course I'm not personally familiar with using street-gang language, but I've been given to understand that by the time it appears on the Broadway stage (which West Side Story originally did in the 1950s, I believe), street slang is already passé on the street. ;)
     
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