getting puns together' / 'up-Churchill battle

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Jaeseong Park

New Member
Korean
Hi, It's an part of CNN article which was about artillery simulation program.

And I'm struggling with the sentence below

'Getting puns together could be an up-Churchill battle and that's not the only deterrent for those who wouldn't have a blast.'

In this sentence, what is the meaning of 'getting puns together' and 'up-Churchill battle'?

I searched up dictionary and googled it but cannot find meaning...

Plz give me a help!!


Thank you,
 
  • William Holmes

    Member
    English - United Kingdom
    Well I've been a native English speaker for over 60 years and this is just meaningless gibberish to me! Can you post a bit more of the article or a link to it?
     

    Jaeseong Park

    New Member
    Korean
    Thank you for replying. Haha yeah I also think it's a meaningless saying but I wanna understand his joke!
    Here are the parts of article below.

    And this is the link of the site.
    CNN 10 - March 3, 2017 - CNN.com

    <-----Excess quote removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->

    DEGIDIO: Let it roll. Give it a little gas. Here we go.
    ROTH: I feel like we are going to fall straight down in this tank.
    Sometimes they say diplomacy is best backed by military force. So here we go up this hill.
    Now those sound like gun shots.<...>

    Getting puns together could be an up-Churchill battle and that's not the only deterrent for those who wouldn't have a blast. But if you're looking to hatch a plan for someone who never threads feeling armorous, is this a good idea? <...>
     
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    William Holmes

    Member
    English - United Kingdom
    Do you know the word "gobbledegook" -- well that's what that last sentence is! I've looked at that website and the tank driving and firing of shells sounds like an activity for boys who never grew up and have lots of money to spend!
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Well, regarding the "up-Churchill battle" - it's just a pun on the normal expression "uphill battle". Churchill's name is used because this is a World War II simulation.

    (Sadly, the pun isn't funny:(.)

    ....
    PS Actually, the transcript misses out a couple of the puns - it should read (puns shown in red)

    AZUZ: More like arthrillery.
    Getting puns together could be an up-Churchill battle and that's not the only deterrent for those who wouldn't have a blast. But if you're looking to hatch a plan for someone who never treads feeling armorous, is this a good idea? Sure man.
    I'm Carl Azuz, and we tank you for watching CNN 10.​
     
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    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Thanks, heypresto: I'd forgotten that the Churchill was a type of tank:oops:.


    Welcome to the forums, Jaeseong Park!
     
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    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    If so, LC, it's a miserable failure - the puns in that text are pretty dreadful:eek:.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Another one is "Getting puns together" where puns might be a pun on guns. A weak attempt. Or perhaps I should say "a weak shot".:)
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I don't know who Carl Azuz is so I wouldn't know. And we know that Churchill wasn't known for his puns but others may not and assume that his being witty meant he punned a lot.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Google tells me that Carl Azuz is:
    - the anchor of CNN 10, "a 10-minute digital news show that explains global news to a global audience" (source: CNN home)
    - famous for ending his news shows with bad puns.
     
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    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think he says "getting funds together" - I'm sure this is not cheap. There are a lot of transcription mistakes. "and I drive this tank." "Can I drive this tank?" "flat seats" "flat feet" etc.
     
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