ghost recording

Bączek

New Member
Italian - Italy
Hello, guys!

I'm here to ask your help about a videogame collocate. The sentence is the following:

In this section you can view the ghost recordings of your attempts.

My guess is that such recordings show a kind of shadow or light version of your character attempting to overcome a particular quest. I remember some racing games where you can try to beat your old self (displayed in white/grey on the same screen), so to set a new record. It can be more or less the same feature used when skiers' times are compared by overlapping the recordings of those skiers' performance.

I don't know if there is already a translated/official version of this expression.

My try would be:

In questa sezione puoi visualizzare le registrazioni fantasma/ombra dei tuoi tentativi.

Thanks in advance! :)
 
  • Mary49

    Senior Member
    Italian
    It's a word requiring another specific word in specific contexts. It belongs to the concept of collocation in linguistics.
    I still don't understand, sorry. I cannot find the expression "videogame collocate" anywhere on the Internet. What is the relationship between a videogame and linguistics?
     

    Dryan

    Senior Member
    English - Northeastern U.S.
    "videogame collocate"
    It’s certainly not correct here but I got “Videogame terminology” from that.

    Collocate is used to define words that appear juxtaposed (next to each other) in normal usage more often than by chance.

    e.g.
    Maiden voyage
    Mortgage broker
    Bail bondsman

    These words appear together way more often than normal. They’re almost set phrases.

    I.e. If you google the word “Bondsman” virtually all of the results will be for “Bail Bondsmen”

    I don’t believe ghost recording is an example of this. You can talk about ghosts in whatever context you want; sharing ghosts, racing ghosts, recording ghosts, saving ghosts.

    It’s jargon but not collocation.
     
    Last edited:

    Bączek

    New Member
    Italian - Italy
    I still don't understand, sorry. I cannot find the expression "videogame collocate" anywhere on the Internet. What is the relationship between a videogame and linguistics?
    I'm talking about a collocate within the field of videogames, which - anyway - is not the point of my post. The expression "ghost recordings" is apparently a fixed expression belonging to this specific context. In linguistics, fixed expressions belonging to specific contexts are called "collocates" (from the bigger concept of "collocation"). For example, "stem cells" is a collocate which fuses two words that acquire a brand new meaning if compared to their literal AND independent translations. Hence, "stem" means something, "cells" means something, but "stem + cells" means something different from the sum of their meanings. The same applies to our expression "ghost recordings".

    I hope everything is clearer now.

    I don’t believe ghost recording is an example of this. You can talk about ghosts in whatever context you want; sharing ghosts, racing ghosts, recording ghosts, saving ghosts.
    Well, you can also talk about maidens or cells in other contexts. Collocation, in fact, pertains to words that have different meanings if isolated, whereas they acquire new meanings when put next to other ones.
     

    Dryan

    Senior Member
    English - Northeastern U.S.
    Well, you can also talk about maidens or cells in other contexts. Collocation, in fact, pertains to words that have different meanings if isolated, whereas they acquire new meanings when put next to other ones.
    I disagree.
    In corpus linguistics, a collocation is a sequence of words or terms that co-occur more often than would be expected by chance.

    Ghost recordings is not an example of this.
    Ghost still means the same thing in the context of video games without the word recordings.
     

    Dryan

    Senior Member
    English - Northeastern U.S.
    I think I answered your question.
    The question in the comments asked about the meaning of "videogame collocate" which doesn’t make sense to me here either.
     
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