Girdle of Stone

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yeontan

New Member
Turkish
Hello,

I'm new here, so I hope this is the right place to ask my question. I'm translating Fyodor Dostoyevsky's "Poor Folk", and in one of the letters, there is a quote from a fictional short story named "Ermak and Zuleika". The text mentions "Girdle of Stone" which I can't find the meaning of. The context is as follows:

"Then by heaven and earth I thank you! By heaven and earth you have made me happy! You have given me all, all that my tortured soul has for immemorial years been seeking! ‘Tis for this that you have led me hither, my guiding star—‘tis for this that you have conducted me to the Girdle of Stone! <-----Excess quote removed by moderator (Florentia52)----->"

I'm having a really hard time with this and would appreciate your help. Thank you.
 
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  • Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    Are you translating the story from the Russian original, or from an English translation?

    In any case, it might be more useful to ask your question on the Russian forum. Some of the people there could probably reply to you in English and help you with what the Russian text says.
    Русский (Russian)

    For what it's worth (probably not much, since I don't know Russian), there is one website that calls it in English the "Girdle of Stone of the Urals".
    Full text of "Poor Folk"
     

    yeontan

    New Member
    Turkish
    Are you translating the story from the Russian original, or from an English translation?

    In any case, it might be more useful to ask your question on the Russian forum. Some of the people there could probably reply to you in English and help you with what the Russian text says.
    Русский (Russian)

    For what it's worth (probably not much, since I don't know Russian), there is one website that calls it in English the "Girdle of Stone of the Urals".
    Full text of "Poor Folk"
    Oh, thank you so much. "Girdle of Stone of the Urals" actually gave me a perspective, maybe he is talking about going into the depths of the Ural Mountains, I'm not sure but I'll look into it. It's from an English translation by the way, but I'll try the Russian forum as well, thanks again!
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    ’tis for this that you have conducted me beyond the Girdle of Stone of the Urals! = this is the reason that you have led me beyond the Urals that form a circle of stone (around the place where I was)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
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