give a bit of a battering

Lamb67

Senior Member
China/Mandarin
She gives the stereotype of the anthropologist — a romantic in search of an exotic and disappearing world — a bit of a battering as well. Ms. Dunham first showed up in Indonesia in the immediate aftermath of the anti-Communist bloodbath of 1965-66 that killed a half million people across that country.
More context here (beside Janny Scott's photo):http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/03/books/in-a-singular-woman-janny-scott-portrays-obamas-mother.html?pagewanted=1&_r=3&ref=books

Does the underlined part mean that she shatters the stereotype?

Thanks.
 
  • Lamb67

    Senior Member
    China/Mandarin
    By the way, what does she refer to here?

    The author of the book or the mother of Mr. President?

    She gives ....

    My quess is the author.
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    We don't have enough context to determine who "she" is but the reference seems to be to "Ms. Dunham." There is no reference in the given context to "the mother of Mr. President." You didn't say who the author of the book is, but "she" is probably the author only if the author is "Ms. Dunham" and Ms. Dunham is writing in the third person.
     

    Lamb67

    Senior Member
    China/Mandarin
    We don't have enough context to determine who "she" is but the reference seems to be to "Ms. Dunham." There is no reference in the given context to "the mother of Mr. President." You didn't say who the author of the book is, but "she" is probably the author only if the author is "Ms. Dunham" and Ms. Dunham is writing in the third person.
    Sorry if you have not made it clear.

    My arqument for 'She' refers to Janny Scott, who is author of the book called A Singular Mother, is that the present tense of the verb of 'gives' as opposed to all the past tense of verbs used for Ms.Dunham, who has passed away in Nov.1995.

    Please continue thanks.
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    Usually, a pronoun refers to someone or something that has been mentioned before the pronoun is used. Since the "she" you are asking about is the first wordof the passage in question, neither I nor anyone else can tell, from the information you have provided, what the antecedent of "she" is. My guess that it was "Ms. Dunham" because of the later mention of her and the possibility that the author was occasionally repeating the antecedent of "she" to avoid losing the reader. If that's not the case, then I can't tell who "she" is without some prior context.
     

    Lamb67

    Senior Member
    China/Mandarin
    Usually, a pronoun refers to someone or something that has been mentioned before the pronoun is used. Since the "she" you are asking about is the first wordof the passage in question, neither I nor anyone else can tell, from the information you have provided, what the antecedent of "she" is. My guess that it was "Ms. Dunham" because of the later mention of her and the possibility that the author was occasionally repeating the antecedent of "she" to avoid losing the reader. If that's not the case, then I can't tell who "she" is without some prior context.
    Since the preceding sentence ends with Ms. Scott writes. And to apply what you said here, I have been convinced that 'She' refers to Ms. Scott.

    Aside from verb tense consistence,as I have mentioned, your saying seems to be more relevant in deciding who a pronoun refers to. Thanks.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Missing context: This article is about Ann Dunham, President Obama's mother.

    She was, among other things, an anthropologist, and the sentence refers to her.

    Note: All necessary context should be included in the post itself. People should not be required to click a link to find the information they need. (See: Posting links.)
     
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