give a flying cockdoodle pickle about something

Reecea

New Member
Japanese
"but I really couldn't give a flying cockadoodle pickle about all this viola stuff..."'

This is the phrase a girl who learns to play the viola(an instrument similar to a violin?) said.
I don't understand what she meant.
Please could you explain what it means? Especially I'm confused by the phrase "give a flying cockadoodle pickle about something", is it an idiom or something?
 
  • moustic

    Senior Member
    British English
    This is just a colourful euphemism (I have never heard it before) for the more vulgar expression: I couldn't give a flying fuck.
    = I couldn't care less / I don't care at all about ...
     

    coiffe

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English
    Same in American English -- just a euphemism for the rather infinitely common vulgar phrase; and, it's probably never been used before, since I've never heard it either.
     

    coiffe

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English
    Flying fig! Never heard that one before. I think I hang out in much more vulgar company. :)
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    The meaning is "I don't care". The basic phrase is "I couldn't give a farthing." The phrase is very old in English.

    In place of "farthing", people use anything that is worthless or almost worthless: a fig, a fart, a penny, a feather, a twig. In America, one old saying is "I couldn't give two hoots." I don't know what a "hoot" is, but I am sure it is worthless!

    People who use "bad language" will use curse words for the thing they "don't give". Around 1990 the word "flying" was added, just because "give a flying fuck" sounds nice to some people.

    The girl in the story knows swear words, but doesn't say them: she replaces them with meaningless words like "cockadoodle cucumber". She knows that people who swear (when they are angry or frustrated) use many syllables if they are very angry or frustrated). "Flying cockadoodle cucumber" is 9 syllables, so she is expressing a lot of frustration.
     

    coiffe

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English
    I think many, if not most, Americans would say "I don't give a shit" if vulgarity were not an issue.
     
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