"Give her up"= "Give up on her" ?

roniy

Senior Member
ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
"Give her up"= "Give up on her" ?

I remember asking something similar a few months ago, but this question is a bit different.

Wold you consider these two the same ?
I know you could say "Give up her"(or something like that) but it would mean something different.

by 'her' I mean a girlfreind/wife.


Thanks in advance.
 
  • Musical Chairs

    Senior Member
    Japan & US, Japanese & English
    "I'm giving her up." You're letting her go, probably to let someone else have her (could be a person, or something spiritual like God if she's dying or something) .

    "I'm giving up on her." You're going to stop whatever you were doing to change her, make her feel better, get her to go out with you, or keep her (depends on the context).

    "Give up her" sounds just a little funny without anything around it.
     

    roxcyn

    Senior Member
    USA
    American English [AmE]
    It depends on the context, and espentially they can mean the same thing if you are talking about no longer seeing another person (breaking up).

    "I could never give you up, the way you make my true love shine" -- you're not going to leave.

    Pablo
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    I know you could say "Give up her"(or something like that) but it would mean something different.
    Hi, sorry for asking this, is the structure of "Give up her" used in spoken English? My dictionary only lists the usage ''give up something''; besides, shouldn't the pronoun be between the give and up?
     

    cycloneviv

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    I would say you're right, Kenny. "Give up her" sounds wrong to me.

    I can't think of any circumstance in which you'd say that as a stand-alone phrase; it would have to be part of a longer phrase such as "She had to give up her dance lessons after injuring her knee."
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    I would say you're right, Kenny. "Give up her" sounds wrong to me.

    I can't think of any circumstance in which you'd say that as a stand-alone phrase; it would have to be part of a longer phrase such as "She had to give up her dance lessons after injuring her knee."
    Thank you, cycloneviv, for clarification.:)
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    I would say you're right, Kenny. "Give up her" sounds wrong to me.

    I can't think of any circumstance in which you'd say that as a stand-alone phrase; it would have to be part of a longer phrase such as "She had to give up her dance lessons after injuring her knee."
    Same here.
    I don't think you can use "give up someone" instead of "give someone up"

    But it's okay when it comes to "something" though:
    ---I'm giving up smoking= I'm giving it up ("it" being "smoking")
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    As mentioned earlier, a pronoun should be placed between "give" and "up".
    Hey, I'm curious now:
    Should I say: "I'm giving up Amanda"
    Or "I'm giving Amanda up"?:confused:

    (PS--I know it's "I'm giving her up")
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    A hard question, "Amanda" is a name, not a pronoun. However, I venture to say that it should also be placed between "give" and "up" to avoid possible ambiguity.
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    "I'm giving her up." You're letting her go, probably to let someone else have her (could be a person, or something spiritual like God if she's dying or something) .
    All right, the first one I understand. Thanks.
    "I'm giving up on her." You're going to stop whatever you were doing to change her, make her feel better, get her to go out with you, or keep her (depends on the context).
    But the second one? I didn't really understand your explaination.
    Can its meaning be 'to break up' ? Because then it'd be the same as 'I'm giving her up. "
    "I give up on her because she slept with my best freind".="I give her up becasue she slept with my best friend"
    These two would mean the same ?
    "Give up her" sounds just a little funny without anything around it.
    Well, here I heard 'I give up my children' (I don't know if it is correct either) and I thought it would work with 'her'.
     

    Musical Chairs

    Senior Member
    Japan & US, Japanese & English
    "I give up on her because she slept with my best freind." Just because you "give up" on your girlfriend doesn't mean that you're breaking up with her. What exactly are you giving up on about her? Maybe she thinks she's really ugly no matter how much you tell her she's pretty, and you're giving up on convincing her. That doesn't mean you're breaking up. In this case, maybe you mean that you're "giving up" on her being monogamous, and it sounds like she's someone who normally sleeps with other people or doesn't have exclusive feelings for you. It could mean you're breaking up. I assume you would.

    "I give her up becasue she slept with my best friend" Sounds awkward. It still doesn't mean "I'm breaking up with her."

    You can "give your children up" for adoption, but I think it sounds funny if you use a pronoun after "up."
     

    dn88

    Senior Member
    Polish
    To my mind, "give up her" is a pretty awkward way of saying "give her up".
    Likewise, "give my children up" would be an odd way of saying "give up my children".

    "I'm giving up on her" - I'm going to "forgo the pleasure" of making efforts for her, because she doesn't show the slightest indication of willingness to change, that said, you've come to the conclusion that it's no use doing your best for her

    However, as mentioned by Musical Chairs, context is indispensable
     

    C. E. Whitehead

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Roxcyn is right; you might be able to say "I'm giving up that guy" (or girl) instead of saying "I'm giving up on that guy" (or girl).

    However you often give up someone to someone else;
    I've heard people say,
    "I'm giving him up" meaning "turning him in" (to the law);
    similarly,
    he might
    "give himself up" (again to the law of course, so to someone/something is often implied).


    --C. E. Whitehead
     
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