give me a hug and let me give you a hug

< Previous | Next >

Jerome-dong

Senior Member
Chinese-China
Hi everyone,

Does "give me a hug" always mean the person says that is sad or longly and need a hug as comfort? When you want comfort someone who is sad, can you say "give me a hug"? Or it has to be "let me give you a hug"?

Thanks!
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    It's tricky answering 3 questions at once...I guess I have to copy your questions, to be clear.

    1. Does "give me a hug" always mean the person says that is sad or lonely and need a hug as comfort? No.

    2. When you want comfort someone who is sad, can you say "give me a hug"? Yes

    3. Or it has to be "let me give you a hug"? No.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There's little or no difference. But you might also say "give me a hug" to someone who has just given you some good news, so is happy, not sad.

    "Guess what, Dad. ! I passed my driving test first time!"
    "Well done, love. Give me a hug!"

    Personally, I'm inclined to say that "Let me give you a hug" would be used more often in order to comfort someone.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    2. When you want to comfort someone who is sad, can you say "give me a hug"?
    You should be offering to hug the sad person!
    You might ask for a hug when you need comforting.

    3. Or does it have to be "let me give you a hug"?.
    Yes, you ask the sad person's permission to hug them. However it's meaningless because the person has no opportunity to reply, for example, 'Touch me and I kill you!'
    My hugging is spontaneous: I neither express my intention or request permission.

    From an ancient- British cultural aspect, I'm not sure who would actually, ever, say this, or when. If I want to hug people and think it's appropriate behaviour, I just do it whether the hug recipient likes it or not.
    'Hugs', represented by brackets ((((( - ))))), have become significant on the web for expressing sympathy.
     

    Jerome-dong

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    Yes, you ask the sad person's permission to hug them. However it's meaningless because the person has no opportunity to reply, for example, 'Touch me and I kill you!'
    My hugging is spontaneous: I neither express my intention or request permission.

    From an ancient- British cultural aspect, I'm not sure who would actually, ever, say this, or when. If I want to hug people and think it's appropriate behaviour, I just do it whether the hug recipient likes it or not.
    'Hugs', represented by brackets ((((( - ))))), have become significant on the web for expressing sympathy.
    Thank you, pob14! ((((( - )))))
    Does it have to be 5 brackets each side? :)
     

    Jerome-dong

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    There's little or no difference. But you might also say "give me a hug" to someone who has just given you some good news, so is happy, not sad.

    "Guess what, Dad. ! I passed my driving test first time!"
    "Well done, love. Give me a hug!"

    Personally, I'm inclined to say that "Let me give you a hug" would be used more often in order to comfort someone.
    Thanks, Lingobingo!
     

    Jerome-dong

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    Yes, you ask the sad person's permission to hug them. However it's meaningless because the person has no opportunity to reply, for example, 'Touch me and I kill you!'
    My hugging is spontaneous: I neither express my intention or request permission.

    From an ancient- British cultural aspect, I'm not sure who would actually, ever, say this, or when. If I want to hug people and think it's appropriate behaviour, I just do it whether the hug recipient likes it or not.
    'Hugs', represented by brackets ((((( - ))))), have become significant on the web for expressing sympathy.
    Thank you, dojibear!
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top