Give rise to/lead to the formation of

Albertovna

Senior Member
Russian - Russia
Hello friends,

Could you help me with this?

(1) Interaction between carbonate–chloride melts and the silicate mantle rocks leads to the formation of the second phase of carbonate–silicate melts (source: my translation).
(2) Interaction between carbonate–chloride melts and the silicate mantle rocks gives rise to the second phase of carbonate–silicate melts (source: my translation).

Which one sounds "better" to you? I think the expressions in bold are very close synonyms, but I may be mistaken.


 
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  • smorodina

    Senior Member
    UK
    Russian
    I'd go for the latter.

    <Comment on deleted exchange removed by moderator>
     
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    smorodina

    Senior Member
    UK
    Russian
    Oh, no, I don't think that at all...

    I think the both are synonymous, and if I had to choose, I'd choose the 'formation'...
     

    Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    In my opinion it's to imagine a "phase" being formed. I would say "leads to." Perhaps you should post the original in the Russian forum.
     

    Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    I just don't think that "phases" can be created. I don't think there's a difference between "lead to the formation of" and "give rise to." They mean the same thing. I think phases can take place in a temporal order, so that's why I suggested you say "leads to." I hope more people express their opinions about this.
     

    sendintheclowns

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    Hello friends,

    Could you help me with this?

    (1) Interaction between carbonate–chloride melts and the silicate mantle rocks leads to the formation of the second phase of carbonate–silicate melts (source: my translation).
    (2) Interaction between carbonate–chloride melts and the silicate mantle rocks gives rise to the second phase of carbonate–silicate melts (source: my translation).

    Which one sounds "better" to you? I think the expressions in bold are very close synonyms, but I may be mistaken.


    If the word "phase" refers to a part of a process, I think I would have written:

    Interaction between carbonate–chloride melts and the silicate mantle rocks leads to the second phase of carbonate silicate melt formation.

    But I suppose a phase in chemical terms could also mean a particular sub-structure (a different crystal form or something like that), in which case either sentence seems good to me.
     

    sendintheclowns

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    Here, the word "phase" means "substructure", not "stage in a process." "Melt" is a noun, "something molten."
    In that case, I think either sentence is good. However, there might be a subtle difference:

    (1) Interaction between carbonate–chloride melts and the silicate mantle rocks leads to the formation of the second phase of carbonate–silicate melts (source: my translation).

    This I interprets as that the interaction causes the formation of the second phase, but is not necessarily the source of the material in the second phase ITSELF. (Although it COULD be) There could be multiple steps involved.

    (2) Interaction between carbonate–chloride melts and the silicate mantle rocks gives rise to the second phase of carbonate–silicate melts (source: my translation).

    In this sentence, it seems that it is the interaction between...etc ITSELF that turns into the second phase, perhaps more directly than the first case.

    However, as I said, to me this is a very fine point, and either one makes perfect sense.


     

    Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    Here, the word "phase" means "substructure", not "stage in a process." "Melt" is a noun, "something molten."
    Okay. Sorry for not understanding you. Science is not my forte. If it's something concrete then sentence two would be my choice because "lead to the formation of" is clunky. I still recommend asking in the Russian forum, though, just so we can see the original.
     
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