give rise to

Sylvia_scj

Senior Member
Mandarin
Hi, everybody, I was wondering if the phrase "give rise to" can only be related to "bad" or "unexpected" situation when used in a sentence.
For example: The popularization of cars could give rise to serious air pollution.
Is the following sentence right?
The new brand has given rise to the existence of its own customers.
 
  • ADCS

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Hi, everybody, I was wondering if the phrase "give rise to" can only be related to "bad" or "unexpected" situation when used in a sentence.
    For example: The popularization of cars could give rise to serious air pollution.
    Is the following sentence right?
    The new brand has given rise to the existence of its own customers.
    Nope, that's incorrect as is. However, "give rise to" can be used in a positive sense, such as "the change in circumstances gave rise to new possibilities". "Give rise to" always means change, and usually a bit of unexpectedness. For your sentence, you could say "the struggling company's introduction of a new brand gave rise to a heightened awareness of the company's other brands"
     

    Sylvia_scj

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Nope, that's incorrect as is. However, "give rise to" can be used in a positive sense, such as "the change in circumstances gave rise to new possibilities". "Give rise to" always means change, and usually a bit of unexpectedness. For your sentence, you could say "the struggling company's introduction of a new brand gave rise to a heightened awareness of the company's other brands"

    Thank you so much for your help.
     

    Salvage

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi, everybody, I was wondering if the phrase "give rise to" can only be related to "bad" or "unexpected" situation when used in a sentence.
    For example: The popularization of cars could give rise to serious air pollution.
    Is the following sentence right?
    The new brand has given rise to the existence of its own customers.
    Absolutely, "give rise to" can express a positive or a negative outcome.

    I feel "gives rise to" can be used to simply explain the writer's/speaker's train of thought, the course of his logic. That is, the outcome may be unexpected but it is not necessary that it be an unexpected outcome.
     

    Sylvia_scj

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Absolutely, "give rise to" can express a positive or a negative outcome.

    I feel "gives rise to" can be used to simply explain the writer's/speaker's train of thought, the course of his logic. That is, the outcome may be unexpected but it is not necessary that it be an unexpected outcome.
    Thank you.
    But can we use "give rise to" where we know the exact reason and its result?
    for example:
    Alcohol abuse can give rise to liver disease.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Give rise to means "lead to", "be a cause of", or "enable", so the new brand can give rise to new customers and alcohol abuse can indeed give rise to liver disease.

    Bring about means almost the same thing, to "make happen", "effect", or "bring into existence". It doesn't make sense to me to say "the new brand can bring about new customers" (the customers exist already, but they can be attracted/motivated by a new brand"), but alcohol can bring about changes in a person's liver.
     
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