give someone the shine

Garin

Senior Member
Czech - Czechia
Hello, everyone!
In an episode of CSI, Tommy, an ex-mobster, is talking to Greg, one of the CSIs, about meeting a journalist who was later found dead:

Tommy:
She's a nut job. Few days ago, I'm at the Sports Book at Caesar's. I got a fresh cigar and a fresh racing form. Paradise. She saddles up next to me, asks
me questions about the old days. I give her the shine.
Greg: Yeah, and then you shined the floor with her blood.

What does the part in red mean in this context? From the many options there is one in the Urban Dictionary that might make sense - to ignore, be rude to - but since the UD rating of this definition is not too high I would rather have it confirmed or explained from a more reliable source, such as WD. What do you think?
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    A quick survey of the internet suggests that 'to give someone the shine' means to draw positive attention to that person. You 'give someone the shine' by encouraging other people to appreciate them. I don't see any examples of "give [someone] the shine" used to refer to what one says about oneself, or what one says directly to that other person. However, it's possible that he was either boasting about himself or flattering her. Or could he have been talking up some of the horses on the racing form, for instance? Encouraging her to bet on them?

    Example from an article in the online Millington Star (in Tennessee).
    Littles also had Trojan Pride promoting the skills of teammates like Antonio Webber, Allen Moore or LaKeron Garcia. I guess as an offensive lineman it comes natural to brag on others and give them the shine. [Who’s Who 2013 Part 2 by Thomas Sellers (June 27, 2013)]
     
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    Gevurah

    New Member
    English
    Did it say "saddles up" or "sidles up"? The latter is a common usage. The former I've never heard. To "saddle up" means put the saddle on a horse and prepared to ride.
     

    Garin

    Senior Member
    Czech - Czechia
    Did it say "saddles up" or "sidles up"? The latter is a common usage. The former I've never heard. To "saddle up" means put the saddle on a horse and prepared to ride.
    This is what the dialogue list provided by the producer says, I just copy-pasted the dialogue. However, it is not uncommon for these documents to contain errors and typos.

    However, it's possible that he was either boasting about himself or flattering her. Or could he have been talking up some of the horses on the racing form, for instance? Encouraging her to bet on them?
    Unfortunately, there is no more context in the dialogue for us to be able to deduce whether he was talking about betting on horses. Boasting about himself seems to be a safer bet (no pun intented). Or, maybe, could he mean that he gave her the shine about the old days, described them in bright colours?
     

    waltern

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Based on the limited information we have, it seems the meaning you orginally posted (to ignore) is as likely as any - he was interested in reading his racing form and smoking his cigar, not responding to questioning from a "nut job" (an ex-mobster might naturally be disinclined to talk to a journalist about his past...)
     
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    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    He could have done any of those things.
    I would hope that seeing the film would help decide what kind of person he was, but maybe you don't have access to it, and maybe it wouldn't help anyway.


    Betting is the principal activity at the Sports Book at Caesar's :
    Sports Book Voted the best Las Vegas sports betting destination four years in a row by Review-Journal readers, the Sports Book at Caesars Palace is an environment where energy runs high and winning runs rampant as Las Vegas gamblers follow their action on six oversized 12’ by 15’ screens, a 20’ by 50’ LED board and twelve 50” plasma screens throughout the Sports Book on which to view live sporting events, plus 140 sports seats and a 12” flat screen at every table.​
     

    Garin

    Senior Member
    Czech - Czechia
    Thank you, waltern, for your opinion. You know, sometimes I think that the only reason the scriptwriters use such way-out expressions is to make as bizarre double-entendres as possible (give her the shine / shine the floor with her blood) and to give us, the translators, hard time ;)
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    To me, "give her the shine" is to politely brush her off. You don't actually ignore the person but you don't encourage the conversation in any way or volunteer any information. It's polite, insincerely and desultory.

    Woman A: "Beautiful day, isn't it?"
    Woman B: "Yes."
    Woman A: "That's a lovely purse."
    Woman B: "Thank you."
    Woman A (attempting to keep the conversation going): "Do you know if the bus comes by here often?"
    Woman B: "No, I don't."
    (awkward pause)
    Woman A (discouraged): "Well I guess I'd better get going."
    Woman B: "Have a nice day."

    Woman B is giving Woman A the shine, or shining her on.
     
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