give tuition / give classes

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  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Please provide a complete sentence and describe the relevant background. Your question is otherwise a complete waste of our time.
     

    tufguy

    Senior Member
    hindi
    Please provide a complete sentence and describe the relevant background. Your question is otherwise a complete waste of our time.
    Mark gives tuition to his students in Maths and Science. There are four students in his tuition.

    Petty takes tuition in/for Science and Maths.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Mark gives tuition to his students in Maths and Science." That is a normal sentence using "tuition" grammatically, but there seems no reason to capitalise the nouns. "Maths" would be "math" in AE.

    Your other two sentences are incorrect. Nothing here refers to "give classes". It is very difficult to advise you when you give us so little information about what it is you actually want to know.
     

    tufguy

    Senior Member
    hindi
    "Mark gives tuition to his students in Maths and Science." That is a normal sentence using "tuition" grammatically, but there seems no reason to capitalise the nouns. "Maths" would be "math" in AE.

    Your other two sentences are incorrect. Nothing here refers to "give classes". It is very difficult to advise you when you give us so little information about what it is you actually want to know.
    Petty is a student. She is in tenth class. She takes tuition in/for Science and Maths. Mark is his teacher and apart from Petty there are three more students in his tuition so he has four students in his tuition. He gives tuition to four students in maths and science.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    All your phrases are possible except for one (see below).
    • Tuition is the abstract noun, meaning education in general, to a small number of people.
    • Classes are more specific, meaning sessions (typically of an hour) at a specific time and place.
    The teacher gives tuition/classes; the student takes them.

    Mark gives tuition to his students in Maths and Science. There are four students in his tuition...
    So as you can see, this should be: Mark gives tuition :tick:... There are four students in his class.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Is the practice of additional tuition sessions common in India too? Here, tuition can be given in classes or on a one-on-one basis. We might say, 'The teacher gave/conducted a tuition class' and 'The teacher gives tuition in science and maths.' (You might also see 'The teacher tutors science and maths.')
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Is the practice of additional tuition sessions common in India too?
    Yes. The word "tuition" is usually used here specifically to refer to additional lessons outside regular school, either one-on-one or in small groups. That's the sense in which Tufguy has used it. "Takes tuition" can either mean "attends additional classes" (a student) or "tutors students privately" (a tutor), depending on context.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    "Mark gives tuition to his students in Maths and Science." That is a normal sentence using "tuition" grammatically, but there seems no reason to capitalise the nouns. "Maths" would be "math" in AE.
    You might as well leave it as "maths", because this sentence would be incomprehensible to (or else completely misunderstood by) most speakers of AE. In American English, the only common meaning for tuition is "money paid to a school in order to allow a student to attend." Public schools do not charge tuition, but private schools and almost all colleges and universities (including public ones) do.

    The normal way to say this in AE would be Mark teaches Math and Science. There are four students in his class.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I agree with GWB. In AE the meaning of "tuition" that is "teaching or instruction" is obsolete. We only use "tuition" to mean a fee for instruction. We use "classes" for groups of students learning together from a teacer.

    Teaching 1 student is usually called tutoring or private tutoring. Even a class of 4 is still a private tutoring class. In regular (normal) schools the classes are much larger (18 to 25 students).

    In the US, students often take private tutoring classes (like Mark's) in addition to their regular school classes in those subjects.
     
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