give up a seat on the bus for the old

GaFu

Member
Chinese
1# give up a seat on the bus for the old
2# give up a seat for the old on the bus


I saw 1# from an article.
I’m wondering if 2# precisely expresses the same meaning as 1#.
Is 2# acceptable for a native speaker of English?
 
  • Johnny519

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    1# give up a seat on the bus for the old
    2# give up a seat for the old on the bus


    I saw 1# from an article.
    I’m wondering if 2# precisely expresses the same meaning as 1#.
    Is 2# acceptable for a native speaker of English?
    I think they are the same, so they could be used interchangeably. Let's see what the native speakers say.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Context is also important.
    Imagine that you are sitting on a bench and a bus full of old people stops in front of you and they start to get off the bus. You should give up your seat for one of the old people on the bus.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Generally, "a seat on the bus" is a unit. That is what one gives up for an older person. Therefore, #1 is correct. Version #2 splits this phrase in two. This may not be a technical error but it is confusing, does not sound natural, and is bad style. A native speaker would only use #1.
     

    akhooha

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    1# give up a seat on the bus for the old
    2# give up a seat for the old on the bus
    ...A native speaker would only use #1.
    Two other things should be noted:
    * The "#" should precede the number (i.e. #1, #2, etc).
    * "The old" doesn't really sound natural in AmE. I think most Americans would say "the elderly", or even "senior citizens"...
     
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