give up on me

blahz07

New Member
English
how would I say "thank you for never giving up on me" in french. my best guess is: merci pour n'a me renouncer pas. quite sure it's wrong
 
  • Louf

    Senior Member
    Français/Québec; English/USA
    Or a variety of other possibilities, like
    Merci d'avoir toujours cru en moi
    ;
    Merci d'avoir toujours été là pour moi;
    Merci d'avoir toujours eu (gardé) confiance en moi;
    etc.
     

    shoenning

    Senior Member
    French, France
    how would I say "thank you for never giving up on me" in french. my best guess is: merci pour n'a me renouncer pas. quite sure it's wrong
    After reading the previous suggestions and given the language level, I think that closest to the original sentence is "merci ne de m'avoir jamais laissé tomber" ; the other suggestions are too formal in my opinion (i.e. "merci de ne m'avoir jamais abandonné" would be rendered by "Thank you for never forsaking me", rather)
    Just my opinion of course !
     

    archijacq

    Senior Member
    french France
    "merci de ne m'avoir jamais laissé tomber" implies that you have actually done something for that person - this is not implicit in "giving up on somebody".
    Another suggestion: "merci de n'avoir jamais douté de moi".
     

    Budd

    Senior Member
    American English
    Archijacq, I disagree. In AE "not giving up on somebody" (which is the style of the phrase in question) certainly implies some favorable action if only showing sympathy, understanding, patience, etc. Without that, the person speaking would have no way of knowing if the other person had given up on him or not.
     
    Last edited:

    OLN

    Senior Member
    French - France, ♀
    After reading the previous suggestions and given the language level, I think that closest to the original sentence is "merci ne de m'avoir jamais laissé tomber" ; the other suggestions are too formal in my opinion (i.e. "merci de ne m'avoir jamais abandonné" would be rendered by "Thank you for never forsaking me", rather)
    Just my opinion of course !
    Thanx Budd, I had not even bothered answering the previous post ! ;-)
    Tu aurais pourtant dû prendre la peine de bien le lire.

    to give up on someone (Rappel de la définition: to stop having faith in someone) ne signifie pas exactement laisser tomber quelqu'un.
    Je suis d'accord avec Archijacq : "merci ne de m'avoir jamais laissé tomber" (sic) est une extrapolation*, comme Merci pour votre soutien.
    Lorsqu'on ne croit pas ou plus en quelqu'un, on peut éventuellement le laisser tomber.
    Et pour ce qui est du registre, je pense que tu te trompes en n'envisageant que "laisser tomber".

    Pour rester au plus proche de l'original, y compris du registre, je m'en tiendrais à :
    Merci d'avoir toujours cru en moi
    Merci de n'avoir jamais douté de moi

    * et du mauvais français !:p
     

    Budd

    Senior Member
    American English
    OLN, it would never occur to me to disagree with you on matters of usage et registre en français, and be my guest if you want to beat shoenning over the head. But maybe this helps: in English "thanks for not giving up on me" would rarely if ever be an extrapolation or an assumption. It is normally a direct statement of gratitude to a specific person for genuine reasons and completely unlike the vapid "thanks for your support" which is as awful in English as it is in French.
     

    OLN

    Senior Member
    French - France, ♀
    I hate to insist, but to me, Give up on someone and let down someone are not the same. You can give up on someone and still not let them down/turn your back on them.

    Moreover, I wouldn't consider it gracious to thank someone by telling them "Merci de ne pas m'avoir laissé tomber = Merci de ne pas m'avoir abandonné dans cette situation", like you expected or even deserved to be let down once/if they stopped having faith in you.

    In French, assuming aloud that such thoughts could have crossed their minds would not sound like a sincere way to express gratitude, or be a clumsy one.
    Besides, saying "Merci de ne pas m'avoir laissé tomber" could mean the person has a grudge against those who actually did let him down. It would imply "comme d'autres l'ont fait", and wouldn't be considered polite/appropriate.

    Budd, I think you have enough sentences to choose from and of course you're free to choose whatever sounds best to you.
    :)
     

    Budd

    Senior Member
    American English
    Umm, I'm a little confused, OLN. I said nothing about "letting someone down" (the preposition as adverb goes last in the expression), and it is in no way similar to "not giving up on someone." Strictly as a matter of AE usage and level of language, to let someone down is to disappoint or betray . Not giving up is, as I've said, to show some patience, sympathy, etc. I think your equivalents for the later phrase—Merci d'avoir toujours cru en moi, Merci de n'avoir jamais douté de moi—are good and I will use them. But "You can give up on someone and still not let them down/turn your back on them" does not really work in English. It may be subtle, but would certainly be misunderstood most of the time or simply taken as contradictory.
     

    shoenning

    Senior Member
    French, France
    Tu aurais pourtant dû prendre la peine de bien le lire.

    to give up on someone (Rappel de la définition: to stop having faith in someone) ne signifie pas exactement laisser tomber quelqu'un.
    Je suis d'accord avec Archijacq : "merci ne de m'avoir jamais laissé tomber" (sic) est une extrapolation*, comme Merci pour votre soutien.
    Lorsqu'on ne croit pas ou plus en quelqu'un, on peut éventuellement le laisser tomber.
    Et pour ce qui est du registre, je pense que tu te trompes en n'envisageant que "laisser tomber".

    Pour rester au plus proche de l'original, y compris du registre, je m'en tiendrais à :
    Merci d'avoir toujours cru en moi
    Merci de n'avoir jamais douté de moi

    * et du mauvais français !:p

    One must bear in mind that the use of phrasal verbs implies a language register that is precisely not formal. Thus, for want of more information about the context (which is everything in a translation), I would say that your suggessions could be equally appropriate as mine. Hence the "just my opinion" in my first post.
    Thank you as well for the advice and French lesson which made me smile...
     
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