give up on somebody [passive]

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SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
I have given up on him.

Would you be so kind as to tell me what would be the corresponding passive (or the near corresponding passive, as it were)?

Thanks.
 
  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    As far as I am concerned, the passive condemned by Ewie is correct grammatically, but it is so entirely clumsy and absurd, that I actually agree with him (I mean Ewie). As it often happens, this passive form has its limited application exclusively as a grammar exercise. :)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I think the passive would be usable in the right context;).
    John was seen as a hopeless case, and had been given up on by social worker after social worker. Then he met Mrs L, and his life changed completely.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I agree Loob. This passive doesn't offend my ear in the way that a construction like this does: "He has been being tended by Mrs L." :D
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Oh, I don't know, veli. If we turn 'John' into the young Sean Connery, I think I might be able to think of a context for that too....
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Dunno, ladies. I suppose it is the 3 prepositions I have to think of in rapid succession that I find bothersome... perhaps... Up on by, up on by :)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    There's a well-known example that has far more than three, boozer:):
    A father of a small boy goes upstairs to read to his son, but brings the wrong book. The child says "What did you bring that book that I don't want to be read to out of up for?"
    And variations such as: "What did you bring that book that I don't want to be read to out of about over in Down Under up for?" ;)
     
    It often sounds awkward, but it turns up in informal settings. Here are a couple from the 'net.
    The first book, carried by Amazon, is self published, but the author claims his aunt, an English professor, edited it. The quote is from a blurb on the back cover. The second is from an interview with Hillary Swank, in Manhattan magazine, about her foundation which helps kids get dogs.

    http://www.amazon.com/Yellow-Butterflies-Anatomy-Emotional-Breakdown/dp/1413792189

    Timothy survived to tell the personal story of a man lost in a world of delusion and symbols. He not only takes a physical journey by train around the country but also a spiritual and philosophical journey through his own thoughts and emotions. Does all in life have meaning? Do accidents exist, or is all meant to be? How do we come to exist in this universe? Exactly what is a random event? In this story of crisis and love, we learn what a man whom most would call crazy thinks as he lives a life on the streets of Los Angeles and Tampa. What goes through the mind of someone who has no home and no friends, and who has been given up on by everyone in society? This is his story.
    =============
    http://joonbug.com/tag/the+hilaroo+foundation


    You launched your own animal charity, the Hilaroo Foundation, a combination of your name and your dog Karoo’s name. How did you decide to form a foundation?
    Feeling like an outsider as a kid and wanting an animal that would connect with you and really see you—especially when you’re in a place where you feel you’re not seen—is really powerful. So I thought, how can I bring these two things together—kids who feel like outsiders and animals who have been abandoned—to help heal each other through rescue, rehabilitation and responsibility training? When an animal and a human come together, it’s very healing, especially for a child who has been given up on and who doesn’t trust people anymore.
    --------------------------------
    ADDED: I note that Loob and Velisarius, above, are not, apparently, offended by the construction. It takes some getting used to, I admit.



    I have given up on him.

    Would you be so kind as to tell me what would be the corresponding passive (or the near corresponding passive, as it were)?

    Thanks.
     
    Last edited:

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    There's a well-known example that has far more than three, boozer:):
    A father of a small boy goes upstairs to read to his son, but brings the wrong book. The child says "What did you bring that book that I don't want to be read to out of up for?"
    One question: you are read out of a book = someone reads something to you out of a book?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Do yourself a favor, Vik. Accept that monstrosity of a sentence as a clever example of something that is possible in English. Your attempt to rearrange the sentence really doesn't do anything other than ruin the humor. It shouldn't be anything other than what it is.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Do yourself a favor, Vik. Accept that monstrosity of a sentence as a clever example of something that is possible in English. Your attempt to rearrange the sentence really doesn't do anything other than ruin the humor. It shouldn't be anything other than what it is.
    It ruins humor, indeed, but still, could you tell me if the sentence is still correct with "anything" put into it?
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    "Anything" messes the sentence up. It no longer makes sense.
    Thank you.
    I think it's rather because I wrongly arranged words in #14, not becasue of "anything" itself.
    What did you bring that book that I don't want to be read anything out of to up for?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    What did you bring that book that I don't want to be read anything out of to up for.
    EDIT: This version still doesn't make sense. I thought that removing "to" would make it work, but I realized that it really doesn't help.

    If you must analyze this poor beast to death, it would probably be helpful to break it into smaller sentences: What did you bring that book up for? I don't want to be read to out of that book.

    Gee, Vik. I think you and I have succeeded in squeezing all the life out of that example. I hope you found the exercise useful or at least amusing. :) It gave me a headache.
     
    Last edited:

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    EDIT: This version still doesn't make sense. I thought that removing "to" would make it work, but I realized that it really doesn't help.

    If you must analyze this poor beast to death, it would probably be helpful to break it into smaller sentences: What did you bring that book up for? I don't want to be read to out of that book.

    Gee, Vik. I think you and I have succeeded in squeezing all the life out of that example. I hope you found the exercise useful or at least amusing. :) It gave me a headache.
    Yes, it was pretty much useful, and I think I'll try to squeeze a bit more life out of it by starting a new thread.:)
     
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