Give us a wink and make me think of you

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
Oh, lovely Rita meter maid
Where would I be without you
Give us a wink and make me think of you

Lovely Rita by The Beatles

He tells the story of Rita in the first person. Why does he suddenly say "us" at the end?
Thanks.
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    In fact, the first person plural (we/us) can be used to express almost any person, in colloquial or in formal English. For the Queen and newspaper editors it can mean 'I', used by a doctor it can mean 'you', speaking of an absent person sarcastically it can mean 'he', etc.

    The phrase 'give us a...' (meaning give me...) is so common in British colloquial speech that it passes almost unnoticed.
     

    Kirill V.

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Surprisingly, it is not only doctors who tend to use we/us this way in Russia... A boss would also sometimes say Let us take this file, add all the new data, convert it into a different format, and thus we'll get it updated

    And what he would mean by that is You take this file... and you'll get it updated
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Surprisingly, it is not only doctors who tend to use we/us this way in Russia... A boss would also sometimes say Let us take this file, add all the new data, convert it into a different format, and thus we'll get it updated

    And what he would mean by that is You take this file... and you'll get it updated
    Ah, but is that just a trick of powerful people in any language? I don't know any Russian, but in England is it not unusual for bosses etc to use inclusive pronouns, but actually intend you to be the one doing the work!

    As for the original question, Keith answers it perfectly in #7.
     
    My understanding is that this possessive pluralization is (or was) also particularly Liverpudian.(sp.?)

    I found it quite charming to hear the Beatles in interviews say things like "our Charlie"--made up example--to refer to some member of the family, brother, son, cousin, etc. I'd never head such usage which is strictly BE, unimaginable in AE.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    My understanding is that this possessive pluralization is (or was) also particularly Liverpudian.(sp.?)

    I found it quite charming to hear the Beatles in interviews say things like "our Charlie"--made up example--to refer to some member of the family, brother, son, cousin, etc. I'd never head such usage which is strictly BE, unimaginable in AE.
    It is not exclusive to that region, I sense it is very widespread, we certainly used it in the Midlands. But when your own family and friends say things you have no way of knowing where the boundary for that variation reaches.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    "Our kid" meaning my (younger) brother/sister was common in the English Midlands in the 1950s and I think it still is; in fact it has become a cliché to represent the Birmingham dialect.
     

    Kirill V.

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Good morning!
    Can one look at it this way:
    Give us a kiss - Let us kiss each other
    Give us a wink - Let us wink to each other

    ...
    ?
    i.e. inclusive pronoun us is used "to invite" a mutual action, in a friendly way?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hello kayve

    No, it doesn't imply that the action will be mutual. Give us a wink simply means "give me a wink".
     
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