Give you a chance to see what the other kids are reading before you get started.

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
Elizabeth comes to a dinner to David and his little daughter Emily. During the dinner she remembers she's brought some books for Emily, and gets them from her bag.
ELIZABETH: Your dad asked me to bring over some of Amy's [her niece's] books. These were some of my favorites when I was your age.
DAVID TO EMILY: Oh, that's great. Give you a chance to see what the other kids are reading before you get started.
Hide and Seek, movie

I don't quite understand the sentence, especially -- "get started on what?"

And, is it the imperative?

Thanks.
 
  • Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    I can think of two possibilities - one, that Emily hasn't begun to read yet but is about to start, and two, (and the most likely since it mentions other kids) that Emily will soon be starting school, and this will let her know what her classmates might be reading as she gets started with reading/learning. But it's not clear from the info you've provided (which I suspect is all the info that scene gives you).

    Either way, it's a weird sentence, since what young child cares what books others are reading? It's not competitive, or a popularity thing.
     

    Oddmania

    Senior Member
    French
    It will give you a chance to see what other kids (like Amy) are reading before you start reading, or possibly before you start school.

    "What other kids are reading" (= right now) sounds like he's talking about what other kids her age have been reading since the school year started, as if she might need to get up to speed and catch up on this year's list of books to read before she starts school.

    CROSS-POSTED.
     
    Last edited:

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Sorry, here's a little more context, I think it could be relevant:)

    She can read, since she's writing her diary, and she's 9-10 years old. They have just moved from NY City to Upstate NY, so maybe she's going to go to a new school (maybe that's why "get started"?), and maybe "the other kids" are the kids she's going to learn with, right?
     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    In that case then, yes, that sounds about right - to get caught up with what the other kids at her school might be reading (and as she's older, then what her peers/friends are reading actually may have a relevance), before she gets started at school.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    In that case then, yes, that sounds about right - to get caught up with what the other kids at her school might be reading (and as she's older, then what her peers/friends are reading actually may have a relevance), before she gets started at school.
    But it's still unclear to me though... She didn't move to another country with a different culture or something. She just moved a little up north of her state. Like, children there read completely different books? Or, sounds like she hasn't indeed read any books.
    Those books don't look like school textbooks, and the woman said those were her niece's books, not from school...
     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    I see two possibilities - one, the books may be very different (each school board/county/district may have different set texts) or, and I think this is likely, it's about starting at the new school, and new friendships etc., and the books are what her friends are/were reading, and aren't related to school work.
     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    No - he's talking about something she will begin doing in the future, not giving a command. It's indicative, not imperative.
     

    MarcB

    Senior Member
    US English
    US schools choose their texts locally so even scools close by can have very different books. Some countries have a national curriculum, the US does not.
     
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