Give you a queen in chess.

Discussion in 'English Only' started by newname, Oct 14, 2018.

  1. newname Senior Member

    Vietnamese
    Hi,

    I am a weaker player, so I tell my friend:
    1 ‘you must give me a queen and a knight’.
    2 ‘You must give me a handicap of a king and a queen.’
    3 ‘ You must give me a start of a king and a queen.’
    4 ‘You must give me a head start of a king and a queen.’

    Are they idiomatic?

    Thank you.
     
  2. dojibear

    dojibear Senior Member

    Fresno CA
    English - Northeast US
    This means the stronger player will play the game with 1 less queen and 1 less knight.

    For that meaning, 1 and 2 are idiomatic. We also say "you must spot me a queen and a knight".

    For that meaning 3 ("a start") and 4 ("a head start") are not idiomatic.

    In a race (or a game that is like a race) a "head start" means you start running first, or you start some distance ahead.
     
  3. bennymix

    bennymix Senior Member

    Ontario, Canada. I grew up in US.
    English (American).
    By the way, in chess, one player cannot spot the other a king and a queen.
     
  4. dojibear

    dojibear Senior Member

    Fresno CA
    English - Northeast US
    If the king is captured, the game is over. So it is impossible to "spot" a king.
     
  5. newname Senior Member

    Vietnamese
    Thank you very much. By the way, what’s wrong with spotting a king? The game will be over when all your opponent’s pieces are captured. It’s much more fun. You should give it a try.:D
     
  6. dojibear

    dojibear Senior Member

    Fresno CA
    English - Northeast US
    You can play anything you want, but it is not "chess". In chess, the game is not over when all your opponent's pieces are captured. That's not how it was played 1500 years ago. It isn't how it is played today.
     
  7. e2efour

    e2efour Senior Member

    England (aged 76)
    UK English
    When you play someone in chess, the usual terminology is to give them odds of a piece.
    So I would say instead of 1) You must give me odds of a queen and knight or give me queen and knight odds.
    Colloquially you could just use give instead of give odds, but not in writing.

    Sentence 2) is correct.

    As pointed out, you cannot give odds of a king.

    As for spot, I have never heard this and obviously I can't comment on how frequent it is since it seems to be a US word (colloquial). Spot is normally used to spot the opponent's plan.
     
  8. newname Senior Member

    Vietnamese
    Thank you. Is it correct to say:

    I can give odds of a queen. (No indirect objects like you, her, him etc.)
     
  9. e2efour

    e2efour Senior Member

    England (aged 76)
    UK English
    Yes, the pronoun is optional when you are talking generally (i.e. meaning to give anyone odds).

    But if I were to play someone, I would say to them I can give you/You can have odds of a queen/queen odds.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2018

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