Given [that premise]

ljswj

Member
china
Hi, everyone!
I'm puzzled about the meaning of the phrase "given that premise", could you help me?:(

We believe, perhaps with naive optimism, that many attributes of the physical universe can be known with certainty, and that the scientific process of observation and experiment is quite simply the best way to discover these traits.
Given that premise, which I daresay is shared by the vast majority of people who do research for a living, we can recognize three broad categories of factual knowledge.

Does given serve as a preposition? Is given that premise=take that premise into account ?

Thank you!
 
  • Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hi ljswj,

    It means "If you accept this assumption" or "accepting this idea."

    In this specific paragraph, the assumption or premise or idea is "We believe, perhaps with naive optimism, that many attributes of the physical universe can be known with certainty, and that the scientific process of observation and experiment is quite simply the best way to discover these traits."

    The writer is saying that if you accept this idea, then you can follow his argument that there are "three broad categories of factual knowledge."

    The language here is the language of logical argument; that's probably why it sounds a bit strange.

    I hope this is helpful.
    Joelline
     

    Duffie

    New Member
    English / USA
    This same language is used in Mathematical reasoning. It's like "If X is true, then Y." In that example, then acts like Given that premise.

    When we talk about things using "If," we don't use "Given that premise" or other things like it. It's implied, so we don't use it at all. For example, we say "If I fell down, it would hurt," instead of "Given that I fell down, it would hurt." Things like "Given that" and ", then..." are usually dropped in informal speech.

    Like Joelline said, it's used in logic as well.
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    ljswj,

    First, you need to understand that this is not a term you would use in informal writing or (generally) in conversation. You would use it in a debate, in a logical argument, in a formal paper. I'll give you one example of my own and 2 that I found on the internet. You should do a google search for "given this premise" or "given that premise" and you'll find hundreds of other examples.

    Men and women are intrisically equal; given this premise, it follows that they should earn the same salaries for doing the same jobs.

    "What the web will be and how it will end up is unknown. What can be said, however, is that it's here to stay. Now given this premise, its time to take a look at how to best use it." (found HERE)

    "In order to uphold the academic integrity of the institution, all members of the academic community, faculty and students alike, must assume responsibility for providing an educational environment of the highest standards characterized by a spirit of academic honesty; therefore, given this premise, under no circumstances will academic dishonesty be tolerated at this institution." (found HERE)

    I hope this helps you.
    Joelline
     
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