Given the precise terms of planning application

Discussion in 'English Only' started by burkuu, Dec 11, 2013.

  1. burkuu Senior Member

    Istanbul
    turkish
    Dear all,

    I have a difficulty in understanding the following sentence; can you help me rephrasing this?

    Given the precise terms of the planning application, which was turned down by Vale councilors last year, it is unlikely that the planning inspector at today’s inquiry will hear detailed submissions about the dangers or otherwise of fracking.

    This is taken from the article you can find through this link:

    http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/fracking-inquiry-air-arguments-over-2031166

    I particularly could not get the meaning by "given the precise terms of the planning application"; for example, does "terms" here refer to "scheduling" or like " agreement terms" and what does "planning application" exactly mean?

    Many thanks in advance.
     
  2. cyberpedant

    cyberpedant Senior Member

    North Adams, MA
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    Google "planning application," if you haven't already. The term is used in the U.K. and is not familiar to this AE speaker. The nearest thing that comes to my mind is "building permit."
     
  3. burkuu Senior Member

    Istanbul
    turkish
    Many thanks for your reply. I googled the term, but results are confusing, generally I find results about planning permission, which is very close to your suggestion. "Planning application" may refer to "application for a permission"...
     
  4. DonnyB

    DonnyB Senior Member

    Coventry, UK
    English UK Southern Standard English
    A "planning application" in the UK is an application made to the local council for permission to build or alter a structure of some sort, or to alter the character of the countryside in some way (by building a new factory or housing estate for example). It has to include the exact details and terms of what's being proposed with all the necessary plans and diagrams.

    If the council turns it down, then an appeal could be made to a planning inspector appointed by the government who would hold an inquiry, usually in public. So that's what the red passage above means: the application in this case was for something which (presumably) involved the use of fracking.
     
  5. lucas-sp Senior Member

    English - Californian
    "Terms" means "terms of the proposed agreement." Someone submitted a proposal or "application" to the department in charge of "planning" public works/land use/etc. The city council turned down this application.
     
  6. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    So:

    Given the precise terms of the planning application
    , = Because the conditions in the application to build something are very precise
    which was turned down by Vale councillors last year, = i.e. the application that was refused by Vale councillors last year,

    it is unlikely that the planning inspector = it is unlikely that the person in charge of reviewing/reconsidering the decision of the Vale councillors

    will hear detailed submissions = will allow detailed evidence

    about the dangers or otherwise of fracking.
     
  7. marsbeing

    marsbeing Senior Member

    I still don't get it.

    Who made "the precise terms", the company or the relevant authority?

    Why wouldn't the planning inspector allow detailed evidence about the dangers or otherwise of fracking?
     
  8. Myridon

    Myridon Senior Member

    Texas
    English - US
    From reading the article, the thing that the application is for will not actually be fracking so fracking is not relevant to the purpose of allowing or disallowing that precisely defined thing.
     
  9. se16teddy

    se16teddy Senior Member

    London but from Yorkshire
    English - England
    The quotation refers to the precise terms of the planning application. The company wrote the planning application, which included a detailed description of the changes it proposed to make. These were its "terms". See meaning 1 here: http://www.wordreference.com/definition/terms

    Like Myridon, I suspect that the author of the article believes that the benefits or otherwise of fracking are irrelevant to the application. As the article explains, "The company has insisted that it has no intention of undertaking a fracking operation in Llandow and will be mainly testing for conventional gas, rather than the more difficult to extract shale gas".
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2014
  10. marsbeing

    marsbeing Senior Member

    Thanks for explaining these details to me, Myridon and Teddy. I appreciate it.

    If you don't mind, I have one more question - can we infer from the context the sort of dangers that are referred to?
     
  11. Myridon

    Myridon Senior Member

    Texas
    English - US
    Other than two of the dangers being mentioned in a quote near the end, the article assumes that the reader already knows this or doesn't really need to know it for the purposes of the article.
     
  12. marsbeing

    marsbeing Senior Member

    I see. Thanks Myridon. : )

    Sorry for my belated reply.
     

Share This Page

Loading...