... , given they clock in and clock out

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polybolos

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi, everyone.
I have a question concerning the sentence below, please help :

Instead of charging for coffee, the international Café Ziferblat — which has locations in Russia, Ukraine, England, and the US — charges £3 ($5.11) per hour for a seat at their cafe including unlimited coffee, tea, snacks and wifi. After five hours, customers can continue to stay for free, given they clock in and clock out at the end of the day. Someone sitting for eight hours will pay just £15 ($25.72) — far less than renting an office.
-- quoted from The downside of the cafe as your cubicle

I have a question
What does underlined phrase mean? Could you explain it with plain English, please ?
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    There is apparently a time clock that patrons use to clock in (stamp on the card the time they arrive) and clock out (stamp on the same card the time they leave).

    For "given" here, I would use "as long as" – "as long as they clock in and clock out at the end of the day." The "at the end of the day" goes with "clock out" – not "clock in."

    In case you're not familiar with time clocks, here's a Wikipedia article on them.

    And finally, clock in/out used to be called punch in/out.
     

    polybolos

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thank you for responding, Copyright!
    There is apparently a time clock that patrons use to clock in (stamp on the card the time they arrive) and clock out (stamp on the same card the time they leave).
    I've got it.
    For "given" here, I would use "as long as"
    Let me confirm one thing concerning the sentence : After five hours, customers can continue to stay for free, given they clock in and clock out at the end of the day.
    Can I think in a way that people who punches in/ out will get the right to continue to stay without charge , on the other hand , people who didn't punch in/ out don't have the right?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Let me confirm one thing concerning the sentence : After five hours, customers can continue to stay for free, given they clock in and clock out at the end of the day.
    Can I think in a way that people who punches in/ out will get the right to continue to stay without charge , on the other hand , people who didn't punch in/ out don't have the right?
    I think that's correct, although they don't say anything about what will happen if you clock in, for example, and don't clock out. If the clocking out is important, I imagine it's because they want to keep an eye on the number of hours people stay there so they can see how their business is doing, and whether or not they need to change it in the future.

    As for people who don't clock in or clock out – well, they're just robbers, aren't they? :) I have a feeling that a manager will have a pretty good idea of what's going on.
     

    polybolos

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I think that's correct, although they don't say anything about what will happen if you clock in, for example, and don't clock out. If the clocking out is important, I imagine it's because they want to keep an eye on the number of hours people stay there so they can see how their business is doing, and whether or not they need to change it in the future.
    I've got it.
    As for people who don't clock in or clock out – well, they're just robbers, aren't they?
    Umm, I assume that the author implied there are people who take products ( a cup of coffee, pies, etc) home.
    Anyway, I understood what the author want to say, thank you so much!
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, takeaway customers. Duh. :rolleyes:

    I guess I was distracted by visiting a large Starbucks in Penang for the first time a couple of days ago. It looked like an open-plan office: nearly everyone had laptops open and piles of papers around them and phones in hand. For a moment, I wondered how Starbucks was making any money. Then I checked out the price of their carrot cake. :)
     
    Last edited:

    polybolos

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I guess I was distracted by visiting a large Starbucks in Penang for the first time a couple of days ago. It looked like an open-plan office: nearly everyone had laptops open and piles of papers around them and phones in hand. For a moment, I wondered how Starbucks was making any money. Then I checked out the price of their carrot cake. :)
    Interesting! In Japan, there are customers who use electronics like laptops with a cup of coffee, too. But I think it would be less than in penang. Most of Japanese don't work at cafes ( though this is just my observation).

    Thank you so much for responding to all my comments! I appreciate it!
     
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