giver and giftee?

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Andrew1980

Senior Member
Hi,

How do you call a person receiving a gift (present)? Can I call him a giftee or such word does not exist?

For example: Children's clothes make the best present both for a giver and a giftee.

Thank you very much
 
  • a passerby

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    I'd prefer "recipient" in most contexts; but "giftee" is a word, and works well in that sentence.

    EDIT: Though not as well as "receiver" does, I'll grant. (It parallels "giver" better.)
     

    Andrew1980

    Senior Member
    Recently, I watched Seinfeld series episode Label-maker where Jerry called Dr. Tim Whateley a regifter. So I wondered whether there is a word giftee.
     
    Last edited:

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    There are many words in dictionaries that people don't actually use very often.
    Ngram viewer comparison of gift recipient and giftee
    The phrase "gift recipient" is currently beating "giftee" by a wide margin and "gift recipient" strikes me as an unusual thing to say - I just added "gift" to weed out "recipient of an award," etc.
    If you extend that ngram to 2008 (which seems to be the max) you'll see an uptick for giftee. Also, I think these ngrams only search books.

    The Corpus of Contemporary American English (corpus.byu.edu) searches magazine articles, blogs and newspapers along with other written forms. The difference is still in favor of "recipient" collocating with "gift" over "giftee" but it is not that wide a margin: 7 instances for giftee vs. 30 for gift near recipient.
     
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