giving up something as a noun

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skye

Senior Member
Slovenian
I can't find the right word again, but this time I have no suggestions of my own.

I'm looking for a word that would say that you have to give up something to achieve another thing, a noun.

The sentence is:

Sport demands a lot of time, talent and "giving up things???".

Looks kind of sad, doesn't it? If you have a better idea, please write it here.
 
  • skye

    Senior Member
    Slovenian
    Thanks, sometimes you know a word, but you just won't remember it when you need it, I think sacrifice fits the sentence well.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    skye said:
    Thanks, sometimes you know a word, but you just won't remember it when you need it, I think sacrifice fits the sentence well.
    You can also use "sacrifices", depending on how you are thinking. For instance, if you have to give up many things, in different areas…
     

    leenico

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. english
    I'm looking for a word that would say that you have to give up something to achieve another thing, a noun.

    The sentence is:

    Sports demands a lot of time, talent and "giving up things???".
    Sports demand a lot of time, talent and depriving yourself of things. ;)
     

    skye

    Senior Member
    Slovenian
    leenico said:
    Sports demand a lot of time, talent and depriving yourself of things. ;)
    Thanks for all the answers, I used sacrifices in the end.

    I was wondering if there is a difference between sports and sport, but there wasn't anything specific in the dictionary. I thought that sports are probably sports in general, and sport is a particular discipline. Can they be used interchangeably as an adjective?
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    skye said:
    Thanks for all the answers, I used sacrifices in the end.

    I was wondering if there is a difference between sports and sport, but there wasn't anything specific in the dictionary. I thought that sports are probably sports in general, and sport is a particular discipline. Can they be used interchangeably as an adjective?
    Hey skye;
    If you are talking about one specific 'sport'..I would say..
    'The sport of Soccer demands a lot of time, talent and sacrifices'.
    General 'sports'
    ' Sports demand a lot of time, talent and sacrifices'.

    You are correct in the usage of the two..'sport'..is used for one type..'sports'..is used for the generalization...when using the word sport..we usually say what that sport is..


    te gato;)
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    "I enjoy sports" might be said by someone who likes to partake.
    "I enjoy sport" might be said by someone who likes to watch.
    Or am I just imagining it?
     

    lainyn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    "Sport" as a singular noun is more of a Britishism. It's perfectly correct English, and doesn't need to be "corrected", but in North American English the construction isn't used.

    Some North American English examples:
    I like watching sports. :tick:
    I like playing sports. :tick:
    It was just for sport. :tick: (but more of a literary expression)
     

    Nocciolina

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    Why is English referred to as British English? Shouldn't it just be English? What about the Scottish and the Welsh? Is there Scottish English and Welsh English?
     

    lainyn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Well, you're from England, so it makes sense to call it English. But to a Canadian or an American, it's rather difficult to distinguish English English from North American English, so that's why we say British English. It's kind of a misnomer though, because no one ever means to include the Scots or Welsh in this category. And yes, we say Scottish, but as for Welsh, I've never encountered a Welsh English phrase - so I've never used it.

    I'm sorry I'm so used to saying British English for English English ... but it sounds a good better than doubling it for clarity, don't you think?
     

    lainyn

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I believe sport can also be employed as a plural noun:
    Sport demands a lot of time.....
    Reply With Quote
    But you didn't employ Sport as a plural noun here - you conjugated "to demand" as if it were singular (or a mass noun).

    ~Lainyn
     

    Nocciolina

    Senior Member
    USA
    English
    lainyn said:
    But you didn't employ Sport as a plural noun here - you conjugated "to demand" as if it were singular (or a mass noun).

    ~Lainyn
    Sorry, I should have been clearer:
    Sport can also be employed as a plural noun, or should have a said a generic, all-encompassing noun to mean sport as a whole, many sports even, more than one hence plural? Conjugated as a singular now. Yes, I am bored at work.
     

    kiolbassa

    Senior Member
    English
    Sport demands sacrifice.

    Both can be used in the same way in the singular. Its much more powerful than saying:

    Sports demand sacrifices.

    Or at least I think so!
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    garryknight said:
    "I enjoy sports" might be said by someone who likes to partake.
    "I enjoy sport" might be said by someone who likes to watch.
    Or am I just imagining it?
    Ahummmm..Sir Knight;
    'I enjoy sport'.??? ..a little cavemanish..no?..
    and you enjoy What sport?..ahhh..the sport of talking Caveman...:D
    Here..(that is not saying much) we say..'I enjoy sports'...to either watch or partake in..when generalizing all 'sports' together..
    'I enjoy the sport of talking caveman'..when talking about one specific 'sport'...but that is just my sporting opinion...

    te gato;)
     
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