glad tidings

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ebrahim

Senior Member
Persian
Hi

How can I use "glad tidings" in a passive sentence? Not "given the glad tidings"!
Let imagine I want to say "Jerusalem, the promised land, glad tidings of which is given in the Bible". Is this natural? what other versions are possible?
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "Jerusalem, the promised land, glad tidings of which is given in the Bible".
    There is nothing wrong with the grammar of this sentence, ebrahim, but I can't say that "glad tidings" is a normal phrase in the English I speak. It sounds old-fashioned and literary to me.

    I notice that our dictionary uses plural verbs like "are" with "tidings" instead of singular verbs like "is": ..., glad tidings of which are given in the Bible. As "tidings" is nonexistent in my own speech, I have no opinion about this.
     
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    ebrahim

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Yes, I'm translating a religious text and I'm not sure what word to use. Is there any more modern term with the same meaning except "news"?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "News" is probably the best modern synonym for "tidings", ebrahim. Please look at my last post again. I added a remark about the plurality of "tidings" in that post.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I agree with owlman, but I think you are losing some of the meaning of the orginal, ebrahim, when you just use "called". :confused:
     

    ebrahim

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I agree with owlman, but I think you are losing some of the meaning of the orginal, ebrahim, when you just use "called". :confused:
    The Persian words, literaly, were : "The land of Al-Quds, the promised land given good tidings in the Torah". I thought when "promised" is there the "good tidings" might be redundant and the meaning might not ruined considerably.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "The land of Al-Quds, the promised land given good tidings in the Torah"
    You'll have a hard time coming up with a smooth, contemporary English translation of this phrase, ebrahim. Here's my attempt: The land of Al-Quds, the promised land that the Torah mentioned favorably. I don't think my version sounds nearly as poetic and literary as your first attempt does.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I think most English speakers are familiar with tidings from the Christmas story, when the angel announced, 'Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people' (Luke 2:10). In other words, I think tidings is still available for use if the context is right.

    In the Christmas story, the good tidings are that God has sent a Saviour. However, I'm struggling however to see the way Jerusalem was given good tidings. Are you saying the city itself is a blessing?
     

    ebrahim

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I think that's a good English sentence but without comparing it with the original (maybe I gave a bad literal meaning), because there is a word there (besharat) which is commonly used in Quran and in every translation it's translated as "glad/good tidings/news). I'd like too keep this color in the translation.
    Another point is that the original wants to say that "the Torah called Al-Quds as the promised land).
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I can't describe it, but in biblical times (well, I guess we are still in them) but there used to be salutions (sp.?)/greetings being conveyed, I think, :confused:, in the writings. It took a long time for any correspondence to get anywhere, period, so, we don't have this style in correspondence anymore, but it existed back in the day.
     

    ebrahim

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I think most English speakers are familiar with tidings from the Christmas story, when the angel announced, 'Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people' (Luke 2:10). In other words, I think tidings is still available for use if the context is right.

    In the Christmas story, the good tidings are that God has sent a Saviour. However, I'm struggling however to see the way Jerusalem was given good tidings. Are you saying the city itself is a blessing?
    Yes, that's a poetic and old-fashioned word but it can be understood yet.
    I mean the people were given good tiding that Jerusalem will be their ultimate land, a utopia. There are similar stories in Islamic philosophy of course
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    Just to be clear, "Al-Quds" is strictly an Arabic term and will be unknown to any English speaker. The name in English, as I think you mentioned above, is Jerusalem.

    I would have no problem with "Jerusalem, the promised land of which the Old Testament bore glad tidings." (Of course, that's just a phrase and not a complete sentence.)
     

    ebrahim

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Just to be clear, "Al-Quds" is strictly an Arabic term and will be unknown to any English speaker. The name in English, as I think you mentioned above, is Jerusalem.

    I would have no problem with "Jerusalem, the promised land of which the Old Testament bore glad tidings." (Of course, that's just a phrase and not a complete sentence.)
    Because we are translating for a website pertaining to the Islamic students there is no problem using the Islamic term, they are familiar with this word
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I mean the people were given good tiding that Jerusalem will be their ultimate land, a utopia.
    OK, this will be familiar in Christian thought too, although we talk about a 'New Jerusalem' or a heavenly Jerusalem. So you are suggesting that Jerusalem itself is the good news. I might suggest a construction similar to Glen's.

    'The land of Al-Quds (Jerusalem), the promised land, of which the Torah (Pentateuch, Jewish Scriptures) gave (bore) good tidings.'

    or

    '.... the promised land, the object of good tidings in the Torah ...'

    (My understanding is that the 'promised land' is Palestine in general, rather than just Jerusalem, but I accept that there might be a different understanding in Islamic theology.)
     
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