glorious cold in the nose

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MaryamSeresht

Senior Member
Persian
Hello,

May I ask if " glorious cold in the nose" refers to catching a cold?

I told all the people in Boots the Chemist. They were waiting for prescriptions.( Imagine a glorious cold in the nose. Imagine a tweaking chirping thrush in the groin. Imagine being a colour, and feeling off it.)
Here a ghost is yearning for all feelings, for every thing in the past, when she was alive.


From Hotel World by Ali Smith.


Many thanks.
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    First you catch the cold then you suffer from it or 'have' it as we say.
    Colds in the nose are not 'glorious': they make a person thoroughly miserable. But she would love to have a really bad cold in the nose; it would be a glorious thing for her.
     
    Last edited:

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    This one is a lot hard to work out than the other two sentences. A "cold in the nose" is just an ordinary cold, but I cannot work out why she has added "glorious". From the other two sentences, I imagine she is thinking of a phrase "glorious cold", but it does not ring any bells with me.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    If she longs to have a cold, then that explains "glorious" (meant literally) and the...er...enthusiastic language for thrush and being off-colour.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Imagine a glorious cold in the nose. -> I'm pretty sure that 'glorious' is pure irony - I have describe my own, and other people's, colds as "magnificent" especially when the symptoms are classic and demonstrable. :D
     

    Not English

    New Member
    Catalan
    Hi! Maybe this is not my site, because my English is not very good, but I am trying to learn it and I am very curious about this language. So I think it could give me ahother point of wiew on it. Let me then make suggestion for the meanning of the phrase "Imagine a glorious cold in the nose". I think maybe the writer is using the word "glorious" in the sense of "magnificient" and she is talking about a big cold, a conspicuous or a very visible one.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    I think maybe the writer is using the word "glorious" in the sense of "magnificient"
    As the OP said, the speaker's a ghost. She can't have a cold or get a thrush infection because she's a ghost, but she'd like to, because that'd bring back the feeling of being alive which she's missing.

    By "glorious", she just means "wonderful", as in "It'd be wonderful to have a cold, because that'd mean I'm alive". She refers to thrush in the same way. A thrush is a bird as well as the word for a certain fungal infection, so she refers to it as a "chirping" one - which could refer to the sound a bird makes and could also in that context mean "flourishing", as in a flourishing infection.
     

    Not English

    New Member
    Catalan
    As the OP said, the speaker's a ghost. She can't have a cold or get a thrush infection because she's a ghost, but she'd like to, because that'd bring back the feeling of being alive which she's missing.

    By "glorious", she just means "wonderful", as in "It'd be wonderful to have a cold, because that'd mean I'm alive". She refers to thrush in the same way. A thrush is a bird as well as the word for a certain fungal infection, so she refers to it as a "chirping" one - which could refer to the sound a bird makes and could also in that context mean "flourishing", as in a flourishing infection.
    After reading the whole paragraph, I think your assessment is the one that makes the most sense and I agree with it. Thank you.
     
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