glorious, salty artery blocker

camping0402

New Member
Chinese
Hi everyone.

I was reading a restaurant review, and here is a paragraph in it:

Hidden beneath all of this is some reasonably solid cooking, though it never quite matches the greatness of the crisp chicken shards with which it begins. Whoever came up with the notion of serving slabs of seasoned, deep-fried chicken skin has a filthy mind. It's £1.75 of glorious, salty artery blocker. Other starters have flowery 15-word descriptions but amount to dippers and wings.

How should we understand the sentence "It's £1.75 of glorious, salty artery blocker."? What do "salty", "artery" and "blocker" stand for here?

Source: By Jay Rayner for The Observer, Sunday 25 August 2013
(Whyte & Brown: restaurant review | Life and style | The Observer)
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Salty means containing a great deal of salt, as is often the case with fried chicken.

    An artery blocker is something that, because of its high cholesterol level, tends to cause blockage of a person's arteries, leading to heart attacks or other health problems. This is also characteristic of fried chicken, since fried foods tend to absorb a great deal of the fat used in cooking.

    Note that he is saying both of these things as a compliment; many Americans have a taste for greasy, salty food.
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Hi there!

    All the words have their regular meanings, and they all refer to the dish of deep-fried chicken skin. Foods with high levels of fat (and salt) are known to clog one's arteries with cholesterol or plaque (this is not meant as a medical truth, but as a description of a notion in pop culture). Therefore "an artery blocker" can mean "a fatty, rich, unhealthy food."

    This particular "artery blocker" is "salty" because, well, it has a lot of salt in it.

    Cross-posted to the max!
     
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    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello camping0402, and Welcome to the Forum! :)

    I think the idea is that unhealthy foods are the ones that we like to eat; that would explain the 'glorious'.

    >> What do "salty", "artery" and "blocker" stand for here?

    These are all unhealthy attributes when applied to food.

    Salt is bad for you, and greasy foods are said to block the arteries.

    Remember to name your source. :) (Cross-posted)
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Salty means containing a great deal of salt, as is often the case with fried chicken.

    Note that he is saying both of these things as a compliment; many Americans have a taste for greasy, salty food.
    Just two observations:

    - the food being described is fried chicken skin, not fried chicken
    - the people in question are probably British, because the price of the dish is given in pounds sterling, not dollars
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Salty: it contains a lot of salt, has a salty taste.

    Artery: a blood vessel that carries blood with oxygen from the heart to the rest of the body.

    Artery blocker: something that blocks (obstructs) an artery. Fried foods, when people eat a lot of them over a long period of time, have this effect because of their fat content.

    Cross-posted, too.
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    Just two observations:

    - the food being described is fried chicken skin, not fried chicken
    Missed that, thank you. Because it earlier said "chicken shards," I assumed it was "the skin of fried chicken," not "chicken skin that is removed and fried."
    - the people in question are probably British, because the price of the dish is given in pounds sterling, not dollars
    I meant to say "Westerners," but since I was thinking of me in particular, it came out "Americans."
     

    camping0402

    New Member
    Chinese
    Hello camping0402, and Welcome to the Forum! :)

    I think the idea is that unhealthy foods are the ones that we like to eat; that would explain the 'glorious'.

    >> What do "salty", "artery" and "blocker" stand for here?

    These are all unhealthy attributes when applied to food.

    Salt is bad for you, and greasy foods are said to block the arteries.

    Remember to name your source. :) (Cross-posted)
    So it is actually using kind of metaphor right?
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    It's an exaggeration, more than a metaphor. The deep-fried chicken skin is literally salty, and the fat it contains does contribute to arterial blockage. It does not literally mean that if you eat a serving of the food, you will immediately suffer from blocked arteries.
     

    camping0402

    New Member
    Chinese
    It's an exaggeration, more than a metaphor. The deep-fried chicken skin is literally salty, and the fat it contains does contribute to arterial blockage. It does not literally mean that if you eat a serving of the food, you will immediately suffer from blocked arteries.
    Got it! Thanks a lot! :)

    By the way, how should we understand the "dipper" in the last sentence "amount to dippers and wings"? Is it one kind of bird or a cup-shaped container?
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I differ from Florentia on this. Whilst there are elements of literal truth within the phrase 'It's £1.75 of glorious, salty artery blocker', I would contend that this is nevertheless a kind of metaphor for, let's say, tastiness.

    >> how should we understand the "dipper" in the last sentence "amount to dippers and wings"?

    I don't think it's a bird. I imagine it's a serving of sauce in which to dip your wings. (No metaphor :)) (Cross-posted with Miss Julie)
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    I differ from Florentia on this. Whilst there are elements of literal truth within the phrase 'It's £1.75 of glorious, salty artery blocker', I would contend that this is nevertheless a kind of metaphor for, let's say, tastiness.
    It's probably a metonymy, since things that block arteries are commonly, by coincidence, also tasty things, so those two things are congruent properties of similar objects.

    Do you think "dippers" are "dipping sauces" or "other things to dip into sauces" (fried cheese sticks, onion rings, etc.)? There are lots of things to dip besides chicken wings in the bar-food repertoire.

    camping, at this point, it would be helpful for you to name your source, or at least explain what restaurant is being reviewed​.
     

    camping0402

    New Member
    Chinese
    I differ from Florentia on this. Whilst there are elements of literal truth within the phrase 'It's £1.75 of glorious, salty artery blocker', I would contend that this is nevertheless a kind of metaphor for, let's say, tastiness.

    >> how should we understand the "dipper" in the last sentence "amount to dippers and wings"?

    I don't think it's a bird. I imagine it's a serving of sauce in which to dip your wings. (No metaphor :)) (Cross-posted with Miss Julie)
    Thanks!! Just because my dictionary told me that dipper is also "a type of diving bird", I was thinking that it was another food, and I was so confusing:p
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Do you think "dippers" are "dipping sauces" or "other things to dip into sauces" (fried cheese sticks, onion rings, etc.)? There are lots of things to dip besides chicken wings in the bar-food repertoire.
    Sauces would have been my guess. Source was also added to post#1. ;)

    Thanks!! Just because my dictionary told me that dipper is also "a type of diving bird", I was thinking that it was another food, and I was so confusing:p
    An understandable confusion. :)
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Well yes, I could find it when I searched the text. So I looked up the menu.

    For starters, there are a lot of wings preparations that come with dipping sauce, but also croquettes & dipping sauce, cocktail wieners & dipping sauce, and chicken strips & dipping sauce.
     
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