glossary of money

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cinnamon

Member
ITALIAN
Each word has its opposite. Do you agree? Are there any mistakes?

generous - stingy
spendthrift - penny-pincher
luxury - necessity
brand new - second-hand
hard up - well off
deposit - withdraw
save - waste
in the black - overdrawn
debt - loan
tight-fisted - extravagant
income - expenditure
worthless - priceless
beggar - millionaire
profit - loss


I have a question.
Stingy, tight fisted, also mean: Which of them do you often use?

In general, all the words are common in the spoken language, aren't they?

Thank you.
Bye

;)
 
  • nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    brand new - worn out (or used up)
    save - spend
    conserve - waste (there is a subtle difference)
    debt - savings
    borrow - lend (the two sides of a loan)
    beggar - self sufficient
    millionaire - pauper


    Just some suggestions
     

    ElaineG

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    cinnamon said:
    Each word has its opposite. Do you agree? Are there any mistakes?

    generous - stingy
    spendthrift - penny-pincher
    luxury - necessity
    brand new - second-hand
    hard up - well off
    deposit - withdraw
    save - waste (or "spend", depending on the context)
    in the black - overdrawn (or, "in the red")
    debt - loan - debt/surplus or lender/borrower or debit/credit or ... lots of possibilities, but debt/loan are not antonyms
    tight-fisted - extravagant (or generous)
    income - expenditure
    worthless - priceless
    beggar - millionaire
    profit - loss

    The possibilities are endless but except for debt/loan, all your antonym pairs work.

    I have a question.
    Stingy, tight fisted, also mean: Which of them do you often use? In normal speech, I probably use "stingy" the most, although tight-fisted is a nice visual. I also use "cheap" in this sense, probably most frequently of all. ("My grandmother is so cheap that she reuses teabags.") I think mean as in stingy is more common in BE - I would use "mean" for someone who is intentionally unkind or nasty ("She says mean things about her friends behind their backs.")

    In general, all the words are common in the spoken language, aren't they? all the ones you mentioned are, yes. Nice list!

    Thank you.
    Bye

    ;)
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    Chassie said:
    doesn't in the black mean to be in debt?

    No, in the black means to have a credit balance, or a profit.

    In the red means to have a debit balance, or a loss, or a debt.

    Black ink - good. Red ink = bad.
     

    ElaineG

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    Technically, in the context of a bank making a loan to someone, they can be antonyms.

    But it's not the clearest association.
    Sort of, but then you have to say "making a loan"/"incurring a debt" to make it clear, and that seemed kind of awkward for a nice list of opposites.
     
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