glued up the door with adhesive tape

Zealous

Senior Member
Russian
The officials have glued up the door with adhesive tape after the suspect has escaped.

A dictionary contains the verb phrase "seal off", that is likely to be used here instead of the words marked with red. But the point is I didn't know the phrase before. So if someone doesn't know or want to say "seal off", what expression should be used? Was my version clumsy?

Thank you
 
Last edited:
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Your version does not work as a synonym for 'sealed off'. To glue, or glue up, something, one usually applies an adhesive liquid or gel–not tape–to one or both surfaces, then binds them together while the adhesive dries or cures.

    If you don't want to say 'seal off', you might use the verb block, or the phrasal verb block off.
     

    Basil Ganglia

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    With the context provided, I don't think the highlighted phrase means "sealed off".

    "Glued up with adhesive tape" describes repair to the door. That phrase connotes that the door was damaged during the suspect's escape, and police used to tape to repair damages done to the door. That is completely different from "sealing off the door".
     

    Franzi

    Senior Member
    (San Francisco) English
    It could mean that they got gummy, gluey residue on the door. If you don't know the phrase before, maybe you could tell us where you saw this and who wrote it (AE speaker? BE speaker? Old? Young?).
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I do not consider the original sentence to be particularly good English. Neither do I recall seeing or hearing that construction.

    Normally, to "glue" something (the "up" is superfluous) is to introduce a bonding agent between two surfaces which are then joined as the glue dries or "sets." It has no particular relationship to adhesive tape.

    "Sealed off" normally refers to prohibition of access to the denied area by varous means. It has no particular relationship to adhesive tape, particularly since adhesive tape is not a particularly strong barrier. (anybody who has tried to prevent access of rodents with adhesive tape can attest to that) For example, an area can be "sealed off" by the presence of polilce.

    I would say the door was "sealed" with adhesive tape, which is to say that it was obvious that the door should not be opened and that any forced entry would be immediately obvious, much like the "seals" applied to luggage by airline security personnel.

    Basil Ganglia's point about temporary repair could indeed be what was meant, but I would have said "temporarily repaired," if that was the intended context.
     

    Zealous

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I saw a movie with the scene where the police wanted to prevent anyone to get to the room where something suspicious has happened. I wanted to describe that scene but couldn't find the appropriate way to do this.

    Thank You for help!
     

    Franzi

    Senior Member
    (San Francisco) English
    I saw a movie with the scene where the police wanted to prevent anyone to get to the room where something suspicious has happened. I wanted to describe that scene but couldn't find the appropriate way to do this.
    Police "tape off" a scene with crimescene tape and "seal" doors.
     

    Zealous

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Doesn't police use (adhesive) tape or glued paper to seal off the denied area? What I saw was small ribbons of paper that were glued to the door post and the door itself. That's why I assumed that expression that I thought that might be correct could be used in the context.
     

    Basil Ganglia

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I saw a movie with the scene where the police wanted to prevent anyone to get to the room where something suspicious has happened. I wanted to describe that scene but couldn't find the appropriate way to do this.

    Thank You for help!
    Thank you for the added context. "Glue up" is definitely not correct. As Fanzi suggested, "tape off" is a suitable verb phrase.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The crime scene tape serves two purposes:

    First it indicates that the area it "off limits" to non-authorized personnel; and second, it serves as a "tamper-evident" seal. That is, the police can tell that the scene has been violated by the condition of the sealing tape.
     
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