go ballistic

piggy94

Banned
Korean&English
Can I use ' go ballistic' in the following situation? I mean can I use this expression in the formal situation?

( teacher to another teacher)

Today, in my class, Tom made me go ballistic. He never listesn to me.

( teacher to students)

Listen to me. Don't make me go ballistic.
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    1. You have not provided context, i.e. we don't know precisely what you're trying to say, i.e. did you really explode out of control?
    2. I do not consider it anything but colloquial.
    3. This previous thread covered a lot of ground:

    go ballistic
     

    piggy94

    Banned
    Korean&English
    If a student often neglects his homework, as a teacher , can I say as follows?

    You never do your work and you make me really go ballistic.
     

    Insom

    Member
    English - Australia
    If you went ballistic in a classroom, you would probably get the sack :)

    To go ballistic is not just to be annoyed. It's an especially over-the-top expression of rage.

    I doubt you would describe yourself as going ballistic anyway, except to admit that your anger goes beyond reasonable limits.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    ...
    I doubt you would describe yourself as going ballistic anyway, except to admit that your anger goes beyond reasonable limits.
    It's interesting that you should say that.
    It seems to me that other people go ballistic, I don't.
    I tried to find any evidence to support this theory, but I failed, but at least there are two of us who think it's odd :)
     

    catlady60

    Senior Member
    English-US (New York City)
    To go ballistic is a colloquial English term connoting anger spiraling out of control.

    The father went ballistic when he found out his teenage son got his girlfriend pregnant.

    In formal settings, you're better off saying that you have become infuriated, got/gotten irate, were enraged, etc.

    The boss became infuriated when he discovered that his employees were stealing from him (or her).
     
    Last edited:

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    As in catlady's example, I think that go ballistic is usually said by children, students, and maybe junior employees of a teacher, senior colleague or other authority figure or role model. I therefore think Piggy94's examples are fine if the teachers are consciously and jocularly using the language of their students.
     
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