[Go/come] upstairs/[ascend/climb] the staircase/walk up the [stairs/steps]

Hello!

Sometimes when I describe our way in a museum to tourists I tell them a thing like this:

"Right now we are going to ... and after that we will see the Gala Rooms of the Winter Palace and then our magnificent collection(s) of the West European Art"

Three dots mean that we will need to get upstairs because our tour always begins on the first floor near the entrance. I would like to know which phrases are the most natural here among the ones suggested further:

1) go/come upstairs (in this case the sentence probably needs reformulating so as to avoid using "go" twice: "Right now we are going upstairs ...." instead of "We are going to go upstairs ....", which sounds bad)

2) ascend the staircase

3) walk up the stairs/steps

4) climb the staircase

Which options are the most natural?

Best
 
  • Michel09

    Senior Member
    français - France
    Hello!

    Sometimes when I describe our way in a museum to tourists I tell them a thing like this:

    "Right now we are going to ... and after that we will see the Gala Rooms of the Winter Palace and then our magnificent collection(s) of the West European Art"

    Three dots mean that we will need to get upstairs because our tour always begins on the first floor near the entrance. I would like to know which phrases are the most natural here among the ones suggested further:

    1) go/come upstairs (in this case the sentence probably needs reformulating so as to avoid using "go" twice: "Right now we are going upstairs ...." instead of "We are going to go upstairs ....", which sounds bad)

    2) ascend the staircase

    3) walk up the stairs/steps

    4) climb the staircase

    Which options are the most natural?

    Best
    Well, you will probably hear a few different options for what sounds the most natural for us here at WR. To me (AmE), the most natural and casual would be "right now we are going (to go) upstairs" and "walk up the stairs", though, I would just say "walk upstairs" (no the).. I don't think that I have ever heard "ascend the staircase". "Climb the stairs" sounds a bit odd in this context, to me. :)
     
    Well, you will probably hear a few different options for what sounds the most natural for us here at WR. To me (AmE), the most natural and casual would be "right now we are going (to go) upstairs" and "walk up the stairs", though, I would just say "walk upstairs" (no the).. I don't think that I have ever heard "ascend the staircase". "Climb the stairs" sounds a bit odd in this context, to me. :)
    Thanks for your reply! Sometimes I used "ascend the staircase", which sounds to you a bit strange. To tell the truth I always suspected of it being too stilted and too formal perhaps. However, several times have I heard "climb the staircase". For example, when tourists were already tired and they say a long staircase in front of them they sometimes asked me: "Do we have to climb this staircase?" Probably "climb" means here that they will have to make an effort to get upstairs, a lot of effort, because they are already exhausted. Maybe this is the reason why "climb" is a bit strange in the context given above when you just say that some rooms are on the second floor and to get there it will be necessary to use the staircase. You think they have not yet got tired. And they cannot, of course, at the very beginning of a tour. Am I right?
     

    Michel09

    Senior Member
    français - France
    For me, I would use "climb" in the context you provided. If I am tired from going up multiple flights of stairs, I may say : "Do we have to climb more stairs?" Or : "do we have to go up more stairs?" But, for starting the tour, I still think "go upstairs" to sounds the most natural.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top