go down under an impossible burden

bosori

Member
Korean-Korea
Hello,

I am now reading "Notes of a native son" of James Baldwin(a great African-American writer) and struggling with phrases highlighted in the passage below.
Could you tell me what "go down under an impossible burden" means in this context?

With these several schisms in the mind and with more terrors in the heart than could be named, it was better not to judge the man who had gone down under an impossible burden. It was better to remember: Thou knowest this man’s fall; but thou knowest not his wrassling. . . .

Any kind of help would be greatly welcomed!
Thank you in advance! :)
 
  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's talking about a man who got overwhelmed by the circumstances and responsibilities in his life. He finally couldn't handle them any more. That's the metaphorical fall.

    Thou knowest this man’s fall; but thou knowest not his wrassling [wrestling]
    This is an interesting line.

    It's saying, "You can all see that this man has fallen. But what you don't know is the details of his personal struggles beforehand that caused it."
     

    bosori

    Member
    Korean-Korea
    It's talking about a man who got overwhelmed by the circumstances and responsibilities in his life. He finally couldn't handle them any more. That's the metaphorical fall.



    This is an interesting line.

    It's saying, "You can all see that this man has fallen. But what you don't know is the details of his personal struggles beforehand that caused it."
    Thank you kentix!
    You even answered for what I wondered about but didn't ask to avoid asking multiple questions at a time.
    It helps greatly!
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top