go for a checkup / for a physical / to be examined

  • dwipper

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    It is correct, and in fact, I think that the verb 'suggest' is one of the few where I still hear the subjunctive used correctly.
     

    dwipper

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Whodunit said:
    My version:
    I recommend him to go to the doctor for a checkup.
    This sounds akward to my ear. I think it would be more common to hear 'I recommend that he go(es) to the doctor for a checkup.'
     

    clapec

    Senior Member
    Italian
    This is what I have been taught about the verb suggest:

    Suggest is not followed by object+infinitive. We can use:

    a. Suggest+ ing-form
    b. Suggest+that clause

    :arrow: a. Suggest+ing-form

    e.g. He suggested having a party.

    When the subject of suggesting is different from the subject of the second verb we can use a possessive adjective.

    Suggest+possessive adjective+ing-form
    e.g. I suggest (your) selling that old car.

    :arrow: b. Suggest+ that clause

    In that- clauses after suggest various verb forms are possible.

    1. Ordinary present and past tenses
    e.g Her uncle suggests that she gets a job in bank.
    Her uncle suggested that she got a job in a bank.

    2. In a formal style, subjunctives are possible, especially in American English.
    e.g. He suggests that she get a job in a bank.
    He suggested that she get a job in a bank.

    3. In British English, should+infinitive is common.
    e.g. He suggests that she should get a job in a bank.
    He suggested that she should get a job in a bank.
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    dwipper said:
    This sounds akward to my ear. I think it would be more common to hear 'I recommend that he go(es) to the doctor for a checkup.'
    Okay, that was what I wanted to use first. But then I've googled both possibilities and there'd been three times as many hits for "recommend him to" over "recommend that he". ;)
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    Afghanistan/USA
    Whodunit said:
    Okay, that was what I wanted to use first. But then I've googled both possibilities and there'd been three times as many hits for "recommend him to" over "recommend that he". ;)
    Hey Whodunit :)

    I'd just like to mention that it doesn't necessarily matter how many times it appears in a search engine; it matters how it sounds to us native
    speakers. I'm sorry to say that your sentence is competely incorrect. Also "recommended him to" is used is in other contexts, where it can be appropriate.


    Take care :)
    Bien
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Bienvenidos said:
    Hey Whodunit :)

    I'd just like to mention that it doesn't necessarily matter how many times it appears in a search engine; it matters how it sounds to us native
    speakers. I'm sorry to say that your sentence is competely incorrect. Also "recommended him to" is used is in other contexts, where it can be appropriate.


    Take care :)
    Bien
    Hey Bien,

    I'll keep that in mind. Thanks for your clear answer. But I have yet another question: Would you say that "to examine" sounds better than "for a checkup"?

    PS: Hope I haven't confused anyone. :)
     

    Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    Afghanistan/USA
    Whodunit said:
    Hey Bien,

    I'll keep that in mind. Thanks for your clear answer. But I have yet another question: Would you say that "to examine" sounds better than "for a checkup"?

    PS: Hope I haven't confused anyone. :)
    "To go for a checkup" is used very commonly in American English. Also, you'll hear "to go for a physical". I would refrain from using "examine", unless you are speaking in a formal matter (i.e. a doctor speaking to his colleagues).

    Example:

    I have conducted a thorough examination of the patient's motor skills. Therefore, I can conclude that she is not under the influence of alcohol or hallucinogenic drugs.

    Bien
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    This sentence is a slightly strange combination of formal grammar and informal clinical terminology.

    Suppose your friend's wife has been asking your advice about her husband. You are concerned and you think that he should seek proper medical advice. What are you going to say to her:
    I recommend that he go to the doctor for a checkup.

    Well, maybe some of you might.
    Me?
    I would say something like:
    I really think he should go to the doctor (for a checkup).
    In the UK, that would mean he should make an appointment to see his GP about whatever problem we had just been discussing. If we had no real idea what the problem might be, the for a checkup phrase would be used.
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Well, Pan, it would depend on who was saying it, wouldn't it?

    For example, if the chap was in a solicitor's office, complaining about a sore back as a result of bad health and safety procedures at work, the solicitor might say I recommend that he go to the doctor for a checkup.

    I am all for plain English, but if one wants a true translation (or as near as possible) one has to look at the whole context.
     
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