Go hard

Johnny500

Member
English - United States of America
"Go hard or go home!"

^i need this translated please & i understand it's an american phrase so i would also like to know if spanish speaking countries have another way of saying this?i'm sure they do.:)
 
  • aztlaniano

    Senior Member
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    What is it about? A coach's instruction to a participant in a sporting event?
    Give us some context, please.
    As a guess, I'd say: Entrégate (a lo que sea) o vete a casa.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    I agree that you need to show us an example of how this phrase is used, or tell us what it means. It's hard to translate it if we don't understand it.

    When you reply, please remember that correct punctuation and capitalization are required here in the dictionary forum.
     

    Johnny500

    Member
    English - United States of America
    ^both of you are from the US but not familiar with this phrase?:confused:

    it could refer to sports but it could also mean to do your best at anything you do in life or give up/quit if you're not ready to give it your all.
     

    aztlaniano

    Senior Member
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    ^both of you are from the US but not familiar with this phrase?:confused:
    it could refer to sports but it could also mean to do your best at anything you do in life or give up/quit if you're not ready to give it your all.

    I think what I suggested before, "entrégate", is valid.
    Or Déjate la piel (en la cancha/en el campo, for sports) o márchate.
    Also "empléate a fondo".
    Empléate a fondo o déjalo, for example.

    This "hard or home" expression may have gained currency only after my death, in 1919.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    ^Both of you are from the US but not familiar with this phrase?:confused:

    It could refer to sports but it could also mean to do your best at anything you do in life or give up/quit if you're not ready to give it your all.
    I'm familiar with the expression, but I've seen "hard" refer to different things in different contexts. While aztlaniano suggested an idiomatic translation, in certain contexts, a literal translation might be better.

    If you are going for a literal translation, there are different words for hard in Spanish (fuerte, duro, brusco, difícil), and the best word might depend on what context was being discussed. For example, in beach volleyball, you might use "duro", but in weightlifting, "fuerte" might make more sense.

    That's why it's always important for you to give us context when you ask a question here.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I have heard this phrase, and it means exactly what Aztlaniano has said. Of course, his translations lack the alliteration and meter of the original, but they are pretty good, in my opinion.
     

    aztlaniano

    Senior Member
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    Here's another, also from sports, although I've cast it in the negative because it sounds more natural to me that way:
    Si no vas a sudar la camiseta, no te la pongas.
    Probably it would better as well to have dejar la piel and the rest in the negative as well:
    Si no te vas a dejar la piel (en el campo) lárgate.
    etc.
     
    Last edited:

    notthatkind

    Member
    Español
    There is a song by Kylie Minogue that's called "Go Hard or Go Home" and it goes like this:

    I said you gotta go hard or go home
    Cause if you get a girl like me all alone
    You better take advantage of the moment
    boy, you better own it
    And you gotta go hard or go home



    So probably the idea of "entregarse" is OK.
     
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