go in/to/into a restaurant/cinema

tigerduck

Senior Member
German / Switzerland
Hello

I know that it is very common for the verb go to be followed by the preposition to. However, are the prepositions to and into also possible?

Shall we go in/to/into a restaurant with friends?
Shall we go in/to/into a cinema with friends?

Do you want to go in/to/into a restaurant with friends?
Do you want to go in/to/into a restaurant with friends?
 
  • tigerduck

    Senior Member
    German / Switzerland
    And what about these questions?

    In which restaurant shall we go? - We could go in/to/into that new Chinese restaurant.
    To which restaurant shall we go?
    Into which restaurant shall we go?

    Which restaurant shall we go in?
    Which restaurant shall we go to?
    Which restaurant shall we go into?
     

    lgs

    Senior Member
    American English
    The most natural choices in AE would be to go to or into, which have different meanings:

    1. To go to is the most general, "I'm going to a restaurant/movies/nightclub."

    2. To go to with friends is also general, but slightly more specific because you're
    adding friends, "I'm going to a restaurant/movies/nightclub with friends."

    3. To go into = enter: "I am going into the restaurant with friends" That is, I'm
    entering the restaurant accompanied by friends and not alone.

    4. We do not use the preposition in all by itself in this case.
     

    synnove

    Member
    English - U.S. California
    Which restaurant shall we go to?
    People ask questions like this a lot, so they sound normal, but ending the question with "to" is incorrect. "To which restaurant shall we go?" is the grammatically correct structure, although it could sound a bit formal for conversational use.
     

    idialegre

    Senior Member
    USA English
    People ask questions like this a lot, so they sound normal, but ending the question with "to" is incorrect. "To which restaurant shall we go?" is the grammatically correct structure, although it could sound a bit formal for conversational use.
    I'm not one to pick fights, but this really stunned me. Can there still be people walking the earth who think it is incorrect to end a sentence with a preposition?:confused:
     

    synnove

    Member
    English - U.S. California
    I'm not one to pick fights, but this really stunned me. Can there still be people walking the earth who think it is incorrect to end a sentence with a preposition?:confused:
    It IS still incorrect. I think it's important for people learning English to know that. It's fine to use in conversation, but unacceptable in any type of formal writing.
     

    synnove

    Member
    English - U.S. California
    Kitenok- There are lots of interesting points on the subject, and I concede. It does seem to be something that should be kept in mind as a general guideline to use when possible, though. It's hard to avoid putting a preposition at the end of some sentences, but if the sentence can be reordered easily or phrased in an alternate way, I always make the effort in professional and academic writing.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    As has been pointed out, we don't go "in" a restaurant, but to:

    Shall we go to a restaurant? Let's go to a restaurant with our friends this evening.

    Under some circumstances, however, we might go into a restaurant; this would refer to the act of entering:

    We're standing in front of the restaurant, where we had promised to meet our friends. It's starting to rain. Let's go into the restaurant and wait for them there.
     
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