go into town/ go out on the town

Eric Chengdu

Senior Member
Chinese
I‘m going to go out on the town.
I'm going to go into town.

it seems the second sentence implies that the speaker is located only in the suburb or outside the town now. However the first one could be anywhere including the center of the city or downtown area. Am I right? Thanks in advance :)
 
Last edited:
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes, 'into town' is just movement; '(out) on the town' means having a wild time, enjoying yourself (and the places in town to do this are presumably near the centre).
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Am I right?
    No.
    I‘m going to go out on the town. - "to go out on the town" idiom - to go to some placewhere there is entertainment/bars/restaurants/clubs, etc., to party; have a good time, celebrate, etc., to drink (and eat) well. Often, "with no regard for the expense.

    I'm going to go into town. - to go to town - to travel to the town.

    (crossposted.)
     

    Eric Chengdu

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you both for your help:thumbsup:

    Hi Paul, why did you say NO? where do you think the speaker live? Thanks
    We were out on the town last night for Valerie's birthday, that's why we're all exhausted today. (where the speaker live doesn't matter, it could be suburb, downtown or outside the town)
    We went into town last night for Valerie's birthday, that's why we're all exhausted today. (it implies that the speaker live in the suburb or outside the town)
     

    Boris Tatarenko

    Senior Member
    I‘m going to go out on the town.
    I'm going to go into town.

    it seems the second sentence implies that the speaker is located only in the suburb or outside the town now. However the first one could be anywhere including the center of the city or downtown area. Am I right? Thanks in advance :)
    You're right.

    PaulQ must have misread the question.
     
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