Go into vs Go inside

JorgeSoñador

Senior Member
Spanish - Mexico
Hi everyone,
I would like to know the difference in meaning between "go into" and "go inside".

Here are a couple of sentences.
1. The boys went into the room.
2. The boys went inside the room.

I know in the first sentence "went into" means "entered" and it's being used the preposition of movement "into". But what about the second sentence? Is it correct?
What is it expressing? What's the difference in meaning between these two sentences?

Thanks in advance,
Jorge
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    To me, "The boys went into the room." is normal, idiomatic usage, but "The boys went inside the room" implies that there's something bizarre about the room, such as those discovered in the ancient Egyptian tombs.
     

    JorgeSoñador

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    I wonder if "went into the room" emphasizes the action of entering and "went inside the room" emphasizes the place. Is that correct?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    To me, "The boys went into the room." is normal, idiomatic usage, but "The boys went inside the room" implies that there's something bizarre about the room, such as those discovered in the ancient Egyptian tombs.
    :thumbsup: :thumbsup: I've never thought about it before, but this makes sense.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Into is a preposition of motion. It is used with verbs of motion and change of state. - it complements the verb.
    Inside is a preposition of place. When used with a verb of motion it indicates the place at which the motion indicated by the verb ends.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Into is a preposition of motion. It is used with verbs of motion and change of state. - it complements the verb.
    Inside is a preposition of place. When used with a verb of motion it indicates the place at which the motion indicated by the verb ends.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup:

    Go into / out of / around / through, etc.
    Be inside / outside / above / below, etc.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Sentence 2 can be said, but this is what it really means:

    2. The boys went (to a place that was) inside the room.

    As others say, "inside" is a place.
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    Into is a preposition of motion. It is used with verbs of motion and change of state. - it complements the verb.
    Inside is a preposition of place. When used with a verb of motion it indicates the place at which the motion indicated by the verb ends.
    Yes, 'inside' is a place. Hence the common usage, no noun following, "It began to rain, so we went inside." (for example a house).
     

    Steven David

    Senior Member
    English USA
    Hi everyone,
    I would like to know the difference in meaning between "go into" and "go inside".

    Here are a couple of sentences.
    1. The boys went into the room.
    2. The boys went inside the room.

    I know in the first sentence "went into" means "entered" and it's being used the preposition of movement "into". But what about the second sentence? Is it correct?
    What is it expressing? What's the difference in meaning between these two sentences?

    Thanks in advance,
    Jorge

    Hi Jorge,

    With both sentences, we understand the same thing. They tell us the boys entered the room.

    The difference in meaning, of course, has to do with the prepositions.

    into - The preposition "into" tells us that "the boys moved in the direction of the room and then went in". Although they first went "to the room" and then "in the room", the preposition is "into", not "to-in". The preposition "into", yes, focuses our attention on the idea of movement on a path - a path from where the boys stand to the room. The preposition "to" means "in the direction of", so "into" tells us "move in a direction that goes from out to in".

    inside - The preposition "inside" focuses our attention on the idea that the boys are in an enclosed area, a relatively larger area with four walls and a ceiling. We only understand the idea of movement because of the verb "went" with the phrase "they went inside".

    The idea with "inside" is that "all sides are covered", and this usually refers to a relatively speaking larger room or area.

    Put the potatoes in the oven. Not "Put the potatoes inside the oven". The oven is a relatively speaking smaller area.

    Let's go inside. It's getting late, and there's a storm coming. < Here, it's implicit that "inside" refers to a structure with a ceiling that has walls on all sides. This is larger than an oven. Still, it's possible to say, "Let's go in. It's getting late." However, "inside" more easily calls to mind the idea of a larger structure that is covered on all sides and that has a ceiling.

    Steve
     
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