Go into

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Go into

If you want to travel abroad, you don’t need English at all. But if you want to know western culture, you do need to go into the language.

I wonder if “go into” makes sense here to mean “learn thoroughly”. I looked it up and I didn’t find something useful. But I think “go into” makes sense.

Thanks a lot
 
  • Susan Y

    Senior Member
    British English
    To "go into" something is to examine it carefully. To "go into a language" is not an idiomatic expression, and would not be understood as meaning to "learn a language". Your alternative of "learn thoroughly" is better.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I wonder if “go into” makes sense here to mean “learn thoroughly”.
    I don't think it does, Silver. I've never heard anybody use "to go into something" with the meaning "to learn something thoroughly".

    People do sometimes use "to get into something" to mean "to take a serious interest in something/to do something in a serious or focused way.": Next year I plan to take some time off so I can really get into my guitar. = "So that I can work seriously on improving my guitar playing."

    Cross-posted with Susan Y
     
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