Go my way: Why no preposition?

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Urigome

Member
Japan-Japanese
Hi, everyone!

I am wondering why "Go my way" doesn't need any preposition after the verb

"Go" is an intransitive verb, and "my way" is a noun phrase
Consequently, I thought some preposition should have been placed between them according to the grammatical rules

Other than this, I saw a few similar usages
"Good things will come your way."
"Random mutancy went the way of polio." (I came across this in "Logan")

These expressions are also confusing me

Would you explain why no prepositions follow "go" in these expressions?

Thank you in advance
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    ...Would you explain why no prepositions follow "go" in these expressions?
    Simply because that's the way we do it. But if it helps to to understand, you can think of "my way... the way of polio..." as adverbial phrases. Or think of "go" as a transitive verb (sometimes), equivalent to its synonym "wend". They wended their way home = They went homewards.
     

    Urigome

    Member
    Japan-Japanese
    Simply because that's the way we do it. But if it helps to to understand, you can think of "my way... the way of polio..." as adverbial phrases. Or think of "go" as a transitive verb (sometimes), equivalent to its synonym "wend". They wended their way home = They went homewards.
    Thank you for the explanation
    I would appreciate it if you could answer one more question
    Does this conventional usage usually occur when "go (or come)" is accompanied with "one's way"? ("the way of polio" could be "polio's way", I suppose)

    Of course, I know this/that/the same way are used as adverbial phrases too though
     

    SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish/AE
    Hi, everyone!

    I am wondering why "Go my way" doesn't need any preposition after the verb

    "Go" is an intransitive verb, and "my way" is a noun phrase
    Consequently, I thought some preposition should have been placed between them according to the grammatical rules

    Other than this, I saw a few similar usages
    "Good things will come your way."
    "Random mutancy went the way of polio." (I came across this in "Logan")

    These expressions are also confusing me

    Would you explain why no prepositions follow "go" in these expressions?

    Thank you in advance
    If you believe that transitivity is a property of verbs (and that "go" is intransitive), then you make an assumption, that "Go my way" has undergone reduction. In other words, "Go my way" is, for example, the reduced form of "Go by way of my way." In the long version, "go" is an intransitive verb with a prepositional complement.

    If you believe that transitivity is actually a property of clauses (not "verbs"), then there is no problem; it is the clause (a one-word clause) that's transitive, either by structure or by meaning (not the verb). In other words, the clause "Go" is different than the transitive clause "Go my way."

    This happens when "go" has its inherent meaning of "movement."

    Then there are construction where "go" doesn't have a literal meaning of "movement," so the idea of "transitivity" is lost or at least diminished. Instead, "go" becomes part of an idiom, a fixed expression, a metaphor. So, Good things will come your way means that you will have "many blessings." Random mutancy went the way of polio means that the same thing that happened to polio (it was eradicated, so that polio became extinct) happened to random mutancy. If you still wanted to focus on transitivity, then what I said above applies as well: what's transitive is either the verb or the clause in which the verb appears (depending on your point of view).

    There's yet another construction where "go" appears in a metaphorical sense, and that's constructions that begin with "There + be:" There goes the neighborhood; There goes my last dollar; There went my life. Here, the noun is not really the object of "go;" rather, the noun represents the (logical) subject. It so happens that these are fixed expressions, and the subject appears last (we don't say "The neighborhood goes there").

    These are all features of English. Unfortunately, grammar/syntax isn't an exact science.
     
    Last edited:

    Urigome

    Member
    Japan-Japanese
    If you believe that transitivity is a property of verbs (and that "go" is intransitive), then you make an assumption, that "Go my way" has undergone reduction. In other words, "Go my way" is, for example, the reduced form of "Go by way of my way." In the long version, "go" is an intransitive verb with a prepositional complement.

    If you believe that transitivity is actually a property of clauses (not "verbs"), then there is no problem; it is the clause (a one-word clause) that's transitive, either by structure or by meaning (not the verb). In other words, the clause "Go" is different than the transitive clause "Go my way."

    This happens when "go" has its inherent meaning of "movement."

    Then there are construction where "go" doesn't have a literal meaning of "movement," so the idea of "transitivity" is lost or at least diminished. Instead, "go" becomes part of an idiom, a fixed expression, a metaphor. So, Good things will come your way means that you will have "many blessings." Random mutancy went the way of polio means that the same thing that happened to polio (it was eradicated, so that polio became extinct) happened to random mutancy. If you still wanted to focus on transitivity, then what I said above applies as well: what's transitive is either the verb or the clause in which the verb appears (depending on your point of view).

    There's yet another construction where "go" appears in a metaphorical sense, and that's constructions that begin with "There + be:" There goes the neighborhood; There goes my last dollar; There went my life. Here, the noun is not really the object of "go;" rather, the noun represents the (logical) subject. It so happens that these are fixed expressions, and the subject appears last (we don't say "The neighborhood goes there").

    These are all features of English. Unfortunately, grammar/syntax isn't an exact science.
    Thank you for explaining it thoroughly
    I really appreciate that
    That was helpful :)
     
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