Go off

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  • pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    I want to go out of Mumbai.:tick: = I want to go somewhere which is not in Mumbai.
    I want to go away from Mumbai. You could say this, although it would be more idiomatic to say "get away" if, let's say, you were tired of the city and wanted to leave it for a while.
    I want to go from Mumbai. :cross: Not idiomatic, unless in a sentence using a "from . . . to" clause, such as "I want to go from Mumbai to Jamshedpur; what's the fastest way to get there?"
     

    BillTanner

    New Member
    English - American
    I want to go out of Mumbai.
    I want to go away from Mumbai.
    I want to go from Mumbai.

    Are these correct ?
    No, those are not quite correct. There is no clear and precise definition I can point to, but in English people usually use "go" when something is simple, like "I want to go into that room" if the door is open. But people use "get" if there is something a little more complicated about the whole thing, like "I want to get into that room" if the door is locked and there is a tiger sitting in front of it.

    So you would say:
    I want to get out of Mumbai.
    I want to get away from Mumbai.

    You wouldn't say "I want to get from Mumbai" unless you were talking about airplane flights or something: "I want to get from Mumbai to London, what's the cheapest way?"
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I want to go out of Mumbai: Correct, but "get out of" is more colloquial. It means to get out of the city itself, but perhaps remain near it.

    I want to go away from Mumbai: Correct and colloquial. It means to travel some distance away from the city.

    I want to go from Mumbai: We wouldn't say this.
     
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