go out of/escape a maze

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Sofia.Green

New Member
Italian
Hi!
Is it correct to say "to go out of a maze" or is it better "to escape a maze"? Or none of them?
I am not sure of this construction, too: "...about the maze I can't go out". How would you correct it?

Thank you in advance :)
 
  • Esca

    Senior Member
    ATX
    USA - English
    I would use "escape a maze" :tick: or "get out of a maze." :tick: I would not use "go out of a maze." :cross:
    I'm not sure what you mean by your second question -- it looks like you've formed a partial sentence. Do you have a full sentence?
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    It depends entirely on what you mean. If you are in a room, you might leave the room, or escape the room, or simply exit the room.

    A maze is a puzzle you try to solve. If you are having a good time trying to find your way through, you would exit the maze when, as Sound Shift suggests, you find a way out of the maze. If the maze is a metaphor for a situation in which you feel trapped, you might want to escape the maze.
     

    Sofia.Green

    New Member
    Italian
    I would use "escape a maze" :tick: or "get out of a maze." :tick: I would not use "go out of a maze." :cross:
    I'm not sure what you mean by your second question -- it looks like you've formed a partial sentence. Do you have a full sentence?
    The sentence is "forgive the maze I can't go out". Is "forgive the maze I can't get out of" better? I've read it in a song written by a friend of mine but I don't know if it's correct.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The sentence is "forgive the maze I can't go out". Is "forgive the maze I can't get out of" better? I've read it in a song written by a friend of mine but I don't know if it's correct.
    Unfortunately, this sentence does not make much sense - we forgive people who have done wrong - we don't forgive inanimate objects. Do you know anything more about what the writer is trying to say and what the maze refers to?
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    Unfortunately, this sentence does not make much sense - we forgive people who have done wrong - we don't forgive inanimate objects. Do you know anything more about what the writer is trying to say and what the maze refers to?
    I agree (though we can forgive a debt) but if these are song lyrics, all bets are off.

    Song lyrics and poems have license to say things that don't make much sense. And sometimes we do get angry at inanimate objects or at situations. When we accept the situation it can feel like forgiveness.
     
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