go out of the

Sayaka

Member
Japanese
Hi everyone. My little sister submitted an English exercise which required her to find out & correct mistakes out of some sentences. One sentence reads:

Mum said, 'Let's go out of the Exit B and turn right'.

There is one mistake in the above sentence according to the exercise, and Exit B here refers to an exit of a train station. My sister changed the "of" to "from"; but her teacher said it was wrong. I just want to know if it sounds right to native speakers when "of" is replaced by "from" in the above sentence. Thanks a lot.
 
  • Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Mum said, 'Let's go out of the Exit B and turn right'.

    If I were to change anything about the above, it would be to remove "the".

    Mum said, 'Let's go out of Exit B and turn right'.

    I have to say that I don't like such questions. I don't think they are very helpful to students. Let's see what others think.
     

    Sayaka

    Member
    Japanese
    Thank you for the reply. The correct answer is actually removing the "the". So, changing "of" to "from" doesn't sound right?
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Nothing sounds right with "the Exit B".

    Even without "the", using "from" doesn't sound completely natural.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Because it is named Exit B (it's capitalized). Articles are not used with names in most cases.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Because it is named Exit B (it's capitalized). Articles are not used with names in most cases.
    I partly agree, but I think it's more than that. It's the fact that "B" is a label that makes the difference.

    Example

    Police officer: Look at the these three men. They are holding numerical labels. Which one committed the robbery?

    Witness: It was man number two.
    (It was the man labelled number two)
    or
    Witness: It was the second man. ("second" is not a label, it is an adjective)
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's the fact that "B" is a label
    To me a name and a label are pretty much the same concept (I almost wrote name/label). It's just what is being named/labeled that varies and determines the word used.
     
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