go out on the pop

Paulfromitaly

MODerator
Italian
Hello everybody,

Two British girls are having a chat on the phone, one of them is sick and she's telling her friend she's probably staying at home for the night.

I was supposed to be going out on the pop but I'm not sure if I should.

Is that another way to say "to be going out on the piss" ?

Cheers
 
  • El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I guess it could be Paul - certainly the context suggest it - but I haven't heard it used.

    Going "out on the piss" wouldn't be used by everyone, and there are many regional variations within the British Isles to provide alternatives. Two from my part of Scotland might interest you: up there, some people talk about going "on the randan" or "on the batter".
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    I guess it could be Paul - certainly the context suggest it - but I haven't heard it used.

    Going "out on the piss" wouldn't be used by everyone, and there are many regional variations within the British Isles to provide alternatives. Two from my part of Scotland might interest you: up there, some people talk about going "on the randan" or "on the batter".
    I've never heard "on the randan" or "on the batter", although I've come over to bonny Scotland quite often :)
    Some more information: the girls are both from Cumbria.
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    You'd know if you'd been out on the randan!

    There may be an element of irony in the phrase. "Pop" is (or at least was, perhaps less commonly now) a generic word used in England to describe gaseous drinks (Coke and the like), and it's almost certain that these two were planning to head out to imbibe something for stronger (or at least with a good dose of alcohol in their pop). Just a thought.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Alcopops are, I understand, composite alcoholic beverages designed to be attractive to young revellers.
    It would not surprise me that someone intent on a night of multi-coloured fizzy drinks of this kind might well say she was going out on the pop.
    Caution: this could be completely wrong.

    <<A minor moderatorial note: The thread topic is out on the pop, not general terms for a night's drinking. There are other threads addressing the general topic.>>
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Thanks panj but surely we are approaching the phrase "out on the pop" on the basis that it, too, signifies a night out drinking? Certainly that was my original interpretation of the phrase, nothing to do with the type of drinks that might be consumed.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I was approaching the phrase on the basis that we have no real idea what it means, but there is a suggestion that it probably means a night drinking. Hence I was seeking to explain how going out on the pop might have arisen, with that meaning.

    Pills get popped, of course, and it's just conceivable that going out on the pop is making reference to other kinds of recreational chemicals, not alcohol.

    (My minor note, above, is seeking to avoid this thread meandering off into a lengthy discourse on the very wide range of expressions used for a night out.)
     

    El escoces

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I guess we need someone younger and more culturally aware, and less likely to spend their Saturday nights answering threads on wordreference.com, to advise us!
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I guess we need someone younger and more culturally aware, and less likely to spend their Saturday nights answering threads on wordreference.com, to advise us!
    Did someone call me?:D
    No-but-seriously, go out on't pop doesn't sound at all odd to me, Paul ~ Cumbria is practically Lancashire, just a bit posher and with more sheep/lakes/farmers. I'd say the term is alive and well in this part of the vast and endlessly entertaining English-speaking world:)
    (When me and Certain Gentleman want to celebrate something we have a bottle of pop, where 'pop' = champagne:D)
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Did someone call me?:D
    No-but-seriously, go out on't pop doesn't sound at all odd to me, Paul ~ Cumbria is practically Lancashire, just a bit posher and with more sheep/lakes/farmers. I'd say the term is alive and well in this part of the vast and endlessly entertaining English-speaking world:)
    (When me and Certain Gentleman want to celebrate something we have a bottle of pop, where 'pop' = champagne:D)
    Thanks Ewie, I owe you one :)
    Just for the record: both the girls are barely 20, so it could be youngsters speak.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top