go sightseeing

Real_

Member
russian
Guys, we had stuck in neibor thread with this some strange question for that thread, but anyway...
The question was:
What changes will be with verb -go in the expression -go sightseeing?
Started a big discussion, but no result.

1) We have been going for sightseeing for 5 hours.
2) We have gone for sightseeing after lunch.
3) After we had gone sightseeing we have gone for lunch.
4) We went for sightseeing for 5 hours.

How all of them sound for yours ears? Can you correct all of them, (but keep the verb -go, please).

Many thanks in advance.
 
  • Real_

    Member
    russian
    OK!
    (1) the choices,

    1) We have been going for sightseeing for 5 hours. or We went sightseeing for 5 hours.
    2) We have gone for sightseeing after lunch.
    3) After we had gone sightseeing we have gone for lunch.


    (2) your own preferred answer,
    These answers are all of mine - we have three different sentences. First two sentances in russian (N1) mean the same due to russian prefixes of one verb -go.

    (3) your reason for selecting an answer.
    (explained above)

    I just asked about sounding to the "english ear". For example: nobody speaking like that because..., no need -for, etc.
    Pleased to any answers. (and correction if possible, but leaving the verb -go).

    Thanks.
     
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    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Guys, we had stuck in neibor thread with this some strange question for that thread, but anyway...
    The question was:
    What changes will be with verb -go in the expression -go sightseeing?
    Started a big discussion, but no result.

    1) We have been going for sightseeing for 5 hours.
    2) We have gone for sightseeing after lunch.
    3) After we had gone sightseeing we have gone for lunch.
    4) We went for sightseeing for 5 hours.

    How all of them sound for yours ears? Can you correct all of them, (but keep the verb -go, please).

    Many thanks in advance.
    You ask for us to keep "to go" but the fact is that in (1) we simply do not say it that way. I shall tell you what we would say.

    1) We have been sightseeing for 5 hours.
    2) We went sightseeing after lunch.
    3) After we had gone sightseeing we went for lunch.
    4) We went sightseeing for 5 hours.
     

    jetstick

    Member
    Spanish & English
    Again, I agree with Biffo, "to go for sightseeing" or any of the variants above are incorrect. The closest one to something correct was the third but there's a clash using your tenses. Have a look at this graphic I've fixed for you, quite useful.

    << --- Google Ngram Viewer: go sightseeing,been sightseeing,going sightseeing,went sightseeing --- >>

    If you try go + for + sightseeing it will return zero matches
     
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    Real_

    Member
    russian
    Thanks a lot, Biffo.
    That was the main reason. (now I see). I mean that I was trying to keep -go, but two -ing together were too much even for my ears. That's why a "turned on" -for (but occasionally the proverb - the more butter the better porridge, is not working in this case).
    (and of course I can not explain why I put -for after -went. Supposedly by the same reason (about proverb). :) )

    Thank you very much. All of you.
     
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    OP: //1) We have been going for sightseeing for 5 hours.
    2) We have gone for sightseeing after lunch.
    3) After we had gone sightseeing we have gone for lunch.
    4) We went for sightseeing for 5 hours. //

    They are all awkward, to varying degrees. As biffo said, leaving aside 'go' is typical and standard.

    The verbal phrase is 'go sightseeing,' --no 'for'--.

    Biffo's proposals, above, are good. (sorry crossposted).
     
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    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    ...
    Assuming 'go' is to be kept, as far as possible,
    1) We have been sightseeing for 5 hrs. ('We have been going sightseeing for 5 hrs.' is awkward.)
    2) We went [present: 'are going'] sightseeing after lunch.
    3) After we had gone sightseeing we went for lunch. ('sightseeing clause was correct)
    4) We went sightseeing for 5 hours.
    Exactly the same solutions as I gave ;)
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    So, the meaning of "go sightseeing" could be different? I mean
    2)We went sightseeing after lunch. (in this case "went sightseeing" means "we saw the sights". Just the telling the fact that we saw them. "sightseeing is a noun) )
    4)We went sightseeing for 5 hours. ("went sightseeing"="were seeing the sights"="we were in a process of "seeing the sights" "sightseeing" is a participle, acting as an adjective)
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    So, the meaning of "go sightseeing" could be different? I mean
    2)We went sightseeing after lunch. (in this case "went sightseeing" means "we saw the sights". Just the telling the fact that we saw them. "sightseeing is a noun) )
    4)We went sightseeing for 5 hours. ("went sightseeing"="were seeing the sights"="we were in a process of "seeing the sights" "sightseeing" is a participle, acting as an adjective)
    These are exactly the same. In fact:
    We went sightseeing for 5 hours after lunch.
    We went sightseeing after lunch for 5 hours.
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    These are exactly the same. In fact:
    We went sightseeing for 5 hours after lunch.
    We went sightseeing after lunch for 5 hours.
    "sightseeing" is the noun in all cases, always?
    ==========
    Also, in these two cases we deal only with the fact, that we saw the sights, not the process of sightseeing like in "we were seeing the sights from one to six o'clock"?
    Also, if we use the continuous form of "go sightseeing" we have the different sense from "went sightseeing"?
    When we are going sightseeing we only are going to see the sights, not we are seeing the sights. I mean this defference in sense.
    In simple tenses, not in continuous forms, the sense of the verb "go sightseeing" is without the change. "to see the sights".
     
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    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "sightseeing" is the noun in all cases, always?...
    Unfortunately not. Sometimes it is the gerund or participle of the defective verb "to sightsee"
    The verb is so defective that (as far as I know) in normal use it only has a gerund/participle form. I can imagine someone saying "I like to sightsee." and being perfectly understood but it's just not idiomatic.

    Here's an example
    A phones B's mobile.

    A: What are you doing?
    B: I am sightseeing at the moment. (participle)

    EDITED to correct my use of grammatical terms - see following posts.


    EDIT
    It appears that the verb "to sightsee" is now accepted at least in AE.
    sight·see intransitive verb \ˈsīt-ˌsē\
    past sight·saw present participle sight·see·ing

    Definition of SIGHTSEE

    : to go about seeing sights of interest
    — sight·seer noun
    Origin of SIGHTSEE

    back-formation from sightseeing
    First Known Use: 1824
    Rhymes with SIGHTSEE
    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sightsee
     
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    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Thanks.
    Unfortunately not. Sometimes it is the gerund of the defective verb "to sightsee"
    But why do you think it is the gerund ? It is the participle in (I'm sightseeng)
    Despite the verb "sightsee" is "forgotten", its participle is still working.
    As I supposed, in the end of the day, the noun "sightseeing" came from the verb-phrase "to see sights"
    To see the sights-->to sightsee-->sightseeing (the participle, gerund)-->sightseeing(the noun)
    =====
    I mean if the "sightseeing" is only a noun in the phrase "go sightseeing", or it could be the participle too, see my last post?
     
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    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Thanks.
    But why do you think it is the gerund ? It is the participle in (I'm sightseeng)
    Despite the verb "sightsee" is "forgotten", its participle is still working.
    As I supposed, in the end of the day, the noun "sightseeing" came from the verb-phrase "to see sights"
    To see sights-->to sightsee-->sightseeing (the participle, gerund)-->sightseeing(the noun)
    =====
    I mean if the "sightseeing" is only a noun in the phrase "go sightseeing", or it could be the participle too, see my last post?
    Oops - you're right. I should have included the participle. I've edited it.

    Here's a little more information - it also mentions the well-known noun 'sightseer'.
    sightseeing 1824, from sight (cf. sights) + present participle of see. Sight-seer first recorded 1834.
     
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    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    sightseeing 1824, from sight (cf. sights) + present participle of see. Sight-seer first recorded 1834.
    Thanks for links.
    It has sense. So it came from "sight"-noun and "seeing". Though I would say, "seeing" was a gerund, because seeing doesn't modify "sight".
    ====What about my question about using "sightseeing" as a participle in "go sightseeing"?See my post #12.
     
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    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Thanks for links.
    It has sense. So it came from "sight"-noun and "seeing". Though I would say, "seeing" was a gerund, because seeing doesn't modify "sight".
    ====What about my question about using "sightseeing" as a participle in "go sightseeing"?
    I'm running out of brain cells now but you can use either.

    I am running.
    I go running.
    I enjoy running.

    I am sightseeing.
    I go sightseeing.
    I enjoy sightseeing.

    It works exactly the same for any active verb.
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I would like to know if the "sightseeing" could be used as a participle with "go"? I mean when "sightseeing" is not the direct object of "go", but acts as an predicate adjective. As you say, it is the noun after "go" I would like to know if it is always a noun?
    in "I enjoy running" "running" could be the participle (I enjoy while (when) I'm running) and the noun (I enjoy it)? If it is a noun(or a gerund), then the sense is a little different to me.
    But I'm not sure if it is possible to say,"I went while I was running" or "I go/went when I'm/was sightseeing"
    "I walked singing" (I walked while I was singing) is OK?
     
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