go slow vs go slowly

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sagar grammar

Senior Member
On the roads i see signs saying "go slow"

Can we use "slowly" in place of "slow" here..??

1-he wants me to go ____ (slow/slowly)
2- the road signs say to go ____- ( slow / slowly)


Thanks in advance..
 
  • I agree with Glasguensis that "slowly" is preferable in your sentences. It is worth pointing out, I think, that "slow" is sometimes used as an adverb, and some people say in some cases it is chosen for the sake of rhythm or euphony. "Go slow" on a road sign seems to me to work better than "go slowly". There are also some idiomatic expressions which use "slow" as an adverb. "My watch is running slow".
    It is also interesting that the opposite "fast" doesn't have the "-ly" suffix. Sometimes when the two words are used in the same sentence, you will find "slow" instead of slowly. "It doesn't matter whether you go fast or slow".
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The road signs are kind of an abbreviation.
    Sorry, but not so.
    It is worth pointing out, I think, that "slow" is sometimes used as an adverb,
    It might be worth pointing out that it is used widely as an adverb and has been so used for more than 500 years. The adverbial use of "slow" has been covered in several previous threads:

    ‘slow and toilsome“ or "slowly and toilsomely"
    can you speak slow or slowly?
    driving slow or slowly
    make it slow/slowly
    slow (adverb)/slowly
    Slow vs Slowly
    slow x slowly
    Slow/slowly
    take it slow versus take it slowly
     

    Warped

    Senior Member
    Finnish, Swedish
    It is easy to remember when you make certain sentences in your head:

    A slow car goes slowly.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It is easy to remember when you make certain sentences in your head:

    A slow car goes slowly.
    That doesn't help mutch. A slow car also goes slow. As I said, and as several other threads have said before, "slow" is commonly used as an adverb meaning "slowly".
     

    sagar grammar

    Senior Member
    Thank you very much...it helped me a lot
    Sorry, but not so.It might be worth pointing out that it is used widely as an adverb and has been so used for more than 500 years. The adverbial use of "slow" has been covered in several previous threads:

    ‘slow and toilsome“ or "slowly and toilsomely"
    can you speak slow or slowly?
    driving slow or slowly
    make it slow/slowly
    slow (adverb)/slowly
    Slow vs Slowly
    slow x slowly
    Slow/slowly
    take it slow versus take it slowly
     

    Warped

    Senior Member
    Finnish, Swedish
    That doesn't help mutch. A slow car also goes slow. As I said, and as several other threads have said before, "slow" is commonly used as an adverb meaning "slowly".
    That usage is pretty vague to me and to some native speakers on other forums. I wouldn't really use an adjective as an adverb, but it can apparently be used as an adverb, since it is mentioned as such in various dictionaries.

    Edit: By "commonly used," do you mean it is used in informal situations or in formal ones, too?
     
    Last edited:

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I mean it's used commonly. It isn't a case of formal or informal use, and it isn't a case of using an adjective as an adverb. There are occasions where "slowly" is more usual, and others where "slow" is more usual. Normally cars go slowly when they are instructed to go slow. Workers in dispute with their employers go slow, not slowly. The comparative form of slow is commoner than the comparative of slowly - we went slower versus we went more slowly. Slow is often preferred to form compounds with participles "slow-moving traffic" rather than "slowly-moving traffic" (both are used, I said "preferred").
     
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