Go <slowly> <even more slowly> <slower> <more slower>

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rituparnahoymoy

Senior Member
Assamese -India
How to use the adjective of fast and slow .

Go slowly. Even more slowly . Slower . more slower ??????
Go faster . More faster.

Can I use more with an comparative adjective?
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    You can use "yet" with faster or slower, but not with "more".

    Go faster; go faster yet.
    Go slower; go slower yet.

    or

    Go faster; go even faster.
    Go slower; go even slower.
     

    rituparnahoymoy

    Senior Member
    Assamese -India
    You can use "yet" with faster or slower, but not with "more".

    Go faster; go faster yet.
    Go slower; go slower yet.

    or

    Go faster; go even faster.
    Go slower; go even slower.
    Drive faster. Drive even faster??? Drive slowly , Drive even slowly??????????

    Slows down the treadmill. Slow it even down ????? Run the treadmill even faster?????

    what are your views on this?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Drive faster. Drive even faster??? Drive slowly , Drive even slowly??????????

    Slows down the treadmill. Slow it even down ????? Run the treadmill even faster?????

    what are your views on this?

    You can drive faster and drive even faster.

    You can drive slowly, and you can drive more slowly.

    You can slow down the treadmill, and you can slow it down even more.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Hi, friends

    My son is participating in a linguistic competition. The nation-wide round of the competition is today. He has been doing some tests and the question below is from last-year's edition of the competition:
    Monica eats_______________ than Jane.
    A) more slowly B) slow C) slower D) slowlier E) most slow


    The kid is 9 years old. English is like a second language in my family - I speak English with the kids. This means that most of what he knows is not from textbooks. He chose C and he would have been be penalised for this. They want him to choose A.
    Any thoughts on how fair this question is?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    It seems old fashioned (or very traditional) to me.

    At one time (so I recall) slow, slower and slowest were strictly adjectives and slowly, more slowly and most slowly were adverbs.

    Current usage allows slow, slower, and slowest to be used as adverbs or adjectives.

    I was taught the traditional way and I ate more slowly.

    Since you know the test takes the traditional approach, I would do so too.
     

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    "More slowly" is what I was taught and what I would use in writing. I might slip into "slower" in less careful speech. The question seems fair to me.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    "More slowly" is what I was taught and what I would use in writing. I might slip into "slower" in less careful speech. The question seems fair to me.
    I agree that 'slower' is less careful, but the kid obviously thought that choosing what he almost always hears from me was a safer bet and I cannot really blame him :( He is too young to know that I myself would have chosen 'more slowly'. The way I see it, a test question must only have one correct answer. Not one absolutely correct, one less correct but usable, and three completely wrong ones...
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Hi, Packard. Could you please rephrase the sentences in red? I don't understand what "yet" and "even" add to these sentences.
    Thanks!
    In each case it is an increment beyond faster, but still not fastest.
     

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    Both "yet" and "even" function as "intensifiers" here. As you might guess, "intensifiers" are adverbs modifying the word they precede, adding more "force" to its meaning.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Both "yet" and "even" function as "intensifiers" here. As you might guess, "intensifiers" are adverbs modifying the word they precede, adding more "force" to its meaning.
    Thanks. I couldn't remember "intensifiers".
     
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